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defining the Problem, the basic inputs are from the stakeholders. This means that the education curriculum must be purposeful – more than just providing facilities for people to be educated. The diagram below (Figure 1) summarized the proposal while showing the various inputs required for each of the three steps in curriculum development (Idrus et al, 2000).

MISSION STATEMENT

INDUSTRY  NEEDS

SOCIETAL NEEDS

PROFESSIONAL NEEDS

PROBLEM DEFINIION

DOMAIN KNOWLEDGE

STUDENT CONSTRAINTS

ACCREDITATION

RESOURCES

TEACHING & LEARNING METHODS

STRUCTURING THE CURRICULUM

ADVISORY BOARDS

EXTERNAL EXAMINERS

INDUSTRY  FEEDBACK

OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT

IMPLEMEN-TATION AND EVALUATION

Figure 1 -   A model for curriculum development (after Grayson)

It would seem appropriate for developing countries to do the first step in the above model as thoroughly and completely as possible. The problem one observes is that developing countries normally pursued an education program that does not address their immediate needs first. There seems to be tendencies to emulate the developed world in having universities when what is needed are polytechnics for example, or having programs at those universities because they exist in the universities of the developed world.

N IDRUS  TRANSFORMING QUALITY FOR DEVELOPMENT KEYNOTE PAPER 7QHES, 29-31 OCTOBER 2002, MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

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