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Not only that this is not true, but it has stopped the developing countries to leapfrog to the fore, as they put themselves through all the problems faced by the developed world previously. This therefore will always keep them behind and forever catching up.

If we were to inventorize the problems faced by the developing countries, the following list may result:

a.

economic – essentially the lack of expertise in running the country economically

b.

dependency on handouts from other countries, resulting in a helpless and cap-in-hand mentality

c.

uneven wealth distribution and access to opportunities

d.

misdirected nationalism especially in the face of increasing globalization

e.

low overall educational level

f.

uneven educational opportunities

g.

excessive size of population

h.

a large part of the population not gaining access to education

i.

archaic and anachronistic systems in economy, education, health etc

j.

corruption and increasingly rampant abuse of government officials’ positions

k.

poor understanding of and refusal to recognize ethics

l.

low pro-activeness partly due to all above, partly due to untoward experiences

and perhaps many more which cannot be included here. The point, however, is clear that there is a multi-dimensional challenge for developing countries and that these cannot be resolved using traditional methods.

It seems logical that the Educational Master Plan for developing countries addresses or at least takes into account the inventory of problems listed above. It also seems logical and proper therefore that it is divided into three phases namely, Short-Term, Medium-Term and Long-Term.

Short-Term Educational Plan (STEP)

N IDRUS  TRANSFORMING QUALITY FOR DEVELOPMENT KEYNOTE PAPER 7QHES, 29-31 OCTOBER 2002, MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

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