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The MTEP must highlight and implement an education that begins to look beyond survival, but should nevertheless be practical enough to ensure less dependence on foreign countries.

Here again, fitness for purpose is underscored, although not sold as quality.

Long-Term Educational Plan (LTEP)

This Plan looks at 50 to 100 years ahead. The question that needs to be asked is “What sort of an Indonesian (for example) do we want in 50 or 100 years?”. The LTEP then devises an educational journey to reach that aspiration or goal. In this, decisions have also to be made whether facilities are to be provided in-country or that selected citizens meeting the requirements to become or to assist to allow others to become the coveted person be educated and trained elsewhere.

Clearly, the priority for developing countries is STEP.  Granted that MTEP and LTEP do not need for STEP to be completed before being embarked on, however, the priority should be clear and well supported so that the message is understood by all. There is no point, for example to produce PhDs in Economics or Law when what is needed is the proper enforcement of the law and more practical economics. There is no point producing PhDs in Nuclear Physics when the country is expected to be running out of electricity within a year and there is an abundance of natural and renewable energy sources. The former is an example of lack of fitness for purpose or quality.

Conclusion

In developing countries, the basic definition of quality, viz. fitness for purpose, has been shown to be potent in developing an educational policy and educational practices to help the countries climb out of their chronic and potentially crippling predicaments.

N IDRUS  TRANSFORMING QUALITY FOR DEVELOPMENT KEYNOTE PAPER 7QHES, 29-31 OCTOBER 2002, MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

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