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Quality or fitness for purpose in this case has been shown capable to be transformed into simple and practical chunks of educational policy and practices that will help developing countries improve their existence.

To ensure ratcheted progress, developing countries need to divide its Educational Plan into three phases, the Short-Term (STEP), the Middle-Term (MTEP) and the Long-Term Educational Plans (LTEP) with priority given to STEP.

That similar problems exist in many developing countries across continents and that countries in the same continent have entirely different educational policies, practices and successes, clearly show that cultures (ethnic) play a very small role if any. Malaysia and Indonesia, for example, have extensive commonality in their ethnicity and thus cultures, and yet they are poles apart in their educational policies and practices. Not only Indonesia is being left behind but also increasingly more Indonesians go to Malaysia now for their education when as recently as the 1970’s and 1980’s, Malaysian flocked to Indonesia to study. Recent PERC (Hong Kong) surveys also showed that Vietnam had overtaken Indonesia in its quality of education, while it is believed that much of Vietnam’s management education is provided by Malaysia.

References

Banda, F K and Polepole M M [2002]   Female participation in Higher Education: Is it an impossible dream,  2nd Pan Commonwealth Forum on Open Learning, Durban, South Africa, July/August 2002

Dikti [2001] Statistics of the Indonesian Ministry of National Education, Jakarta, Indonesia

N IDRUS  TRANSFORMING QUALITY FOR DEVELOPMENT KEYNOTE PAPER 7QHES, 29-31 OCTOBER 2002, MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

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