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Then there is the chronic and sustained resistance to change on the side of the people in developing countries. There are many reasons for such a resistance but the reality is that it exists and exists somewhat profoundly.

Therefore the challenge lies in the hands of those who feel able to assist. In this case it means transforming Quality in order that its essence will be accepted and implemented by the developing countries that badly need it. This is not a small or unimportant challenge. One wrong move will render the effort futile.

The priorities in respect of quality in higher education in developing countries fall into the following:

1.

the curriculum

2.

the faculty and their development

3.

the teaching and learning methodology

4.

the facilities

5.

the students

and these have to be considered conjointly as improvement on only one or two of these will not ensure optimization of the whole, while this is a requirement.

The Curriculum

The basic definition of quality, i.e. fitness for purpose, applies well to a discussion on curricula of programs in higher education in developing countries.  It is clear that curriculum designers need to start not from what they know, a normal occurrence even in the developed world, but from what the country needs most.

Grayson (1978) proposed a simple model of developing curricula. As can be seen from Figure 1 below, it essentially manifested the basic definition of fitness for purpose. In

N IDRUS  TRANSFORMING QUALITY FOR DEVELOPMENT KEYNOTE PAPER 7QHES, 29-31 OCTOBER 2002, MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

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