X hits on this document

35 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

8 / 13

CPAWS

CANADIAN PARKS AND WILDERNESS SOCIETY EDMONTON CHAPTER

P.O. Box 52031 Edmonton, AB., T6G 2T5 Ph: 780.432.0967 Fax: 780.439.4913 www.cpaws-edmonton.org info@cpaws-edmonton.org

1.the ability to not only sustain the interest of youth in natural resources, but to offer continued opportunities for skill and career development. Participating organizations (i.e., government and non-governmental organizations, industry and communities) would be able to enter into long-term relationships with potential employees and ensure that they have the necessary skills, experience and training.

2.a timely intervention for Aboriginal youth. By necessity, a seamless approach would require a long-term, sustained effort. If such an effort were to be launched within the next 2 to 5 years, it would be very timely, as a full 33% of the Aboriginal population is aged 0 -15 years (Statistics Canada, 2001 Census).

3.a balanced approach to skill development. With exposure to math and science, a seamless approach would encourage youth to pursue technical careers, and, additionally, careers that require a post-secondary education.

4.an unprecedented opportunity to engage in long-term tracking of the progress of the participants. This has been a problem with initiatives working in isolation. As a general rule, the success of these initiatives is based largely on anecdotal evidence. Long-term tracking would provide measurable outcomes.

5.increased efficiencies through reduced duplication of effort, one stop shopping for government, communities, non-governmental organizations, academic institutions, and youth, and a greater realized return on the investment made in youth.

6.a model that could be utilized by all of the resource sectors including forestry, agriculture, mining, energy, environment, fish and wildlife. Informal discussions with officials in all of these sectors indicates a difficulty in recruiting qualified Aboriginal people.

7.increased demand for academic programming. Such programming could be tailored to be more relevant to the needs of the youth, as well as future employers.

8.an opportunity to include groups that have not traditionally benefited from government programming. These groups include off-reserve and urban youth, Métis, and non-status Indians. Ideally the approach would include all youth, with a focus on groups that require the greatest assistance.

Proceedings from ForestEDWest II – Banff, Alberta – January 2006

Document info
Document views35
Page views35
Page last viewedFri Dec 09 00:31:43 UTC 2016
Pages13
Paragraphs183
Words4712

Comments