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Volume 49 Winter 2001/2002

FEATURE 24

On the front line Osman Yavuzalp examines NATO’s relations with its Central Asian Partners.

Aral Sea

KAZAKHSTAN

UZBEKISTAN

KYRGHYZ REPUBLIC

Caspian

TURKMENISTAN

Sea

IRAN

CHINA

TAJIKISTAN

PAKISTAN

AFGHANISTAN

DEBATE 26

In the wake of 11 September, where does missile defence fit in security spending priorities? KEITH B. PAYNE vs JOSEPH CIRINCIONE What are the greatest security threats? What resources should be devoted to missile defence?

REVIEW 31

Reassessing the Cold War alliances Petr Lunak considers new thinking on NATO and the Warsaw Pact.

STATISTICS 34

International terrorism

Winter 2001/2002

editorial

The magnitude of the events of 11 September, when terrorists flew hijacked airliners into the Pentagon and World Trade Center, is such that the date has already been ingrained on humanity’s collective consciousness. Few people alive today will ever be able to forget where they were or what they were doing when they heard the news. In response, this issue of NATO Review focuses on new security threats and ways of combating them. In the first of four articles on this theme, I look at how the Alliance has assisted the United States in the wake of the 11 September attacks. Subsequently, Robert Hall and Carl Fox argue that new, comprehensive and transnational strategies are required to deal with the security challenges of the 21st century. Frank J. Cilluffo and Daniel Rankin of the Center for Strategic and International Studies urge a flexible, comprehensive and coordinated strategy to fight terror- ism. Timothy Shimeall, Phil Williams and Casey Dunlevy of the CERT Analysis Center of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, argue that defence planning has to incorporate the virtual world to limit physical damage in the real. Elsewhere, Willem Matser of the Office of NATO’s Special Adviser for Central and Eastern Europe examines the evolution in NATO- Russian relations since 11 September and Osman Yavazalp of NATO’s Political Affairs Division considers the Alliance’s relations with its Central Asian Partners. In the interview, Ted Whiteside of NATO’s WMD Centre describes the work of his centre. In the debate, Keith Payne of the National Institute for Public Policy and Joseph Cirincione of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace discuss how missile defence fits into security spending priorities in the wake of 11 September. In the review, Petr Lunak, outreach editor in NATO’s Office of Information and Press, considers how docu- ments discovered in Warsaw Pact archives are influencing and challenging conventional interpretations of the Cold War alliances. Statistics illustrating international terrorism and a map indicating the nationalities of the dead from 11 September round out the issue.

Christopher Bennett

Vacancies at NATO

Nationals of NATO countries may apply for all posts on NATO’s international staff. Details of vacancies, procedures and application forms are available on the NATO web site at:

http://www.nato.int/structur/recruit/index.htm

NATO review

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