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Ventilator

(cm)

(cm)

(cm)

Yes Yes

Electricity Electricity

29 33

23 24

11 26

4.5 10

Yes

Electricity

26

27

20

6.8

Yes

Electricity

8

25

30

6.1

Yes

Gas

12.7

17.8

10.2

2.1

Yes Yes Yes

Gas Gas Gas

26 9.2 9.2

16 22 22

9 16.2 16.2

4.1 2.4 3.1

Yes

Gas

15

4.5

9

0.68

Yes No Yes Yes

Gas Gas Gas Gas electricity

23.5 16.76 10.6 22.9

11.1 6.35 10.6 28

16.2 8.38 16.5 12.7

4.1 0.165 0.68 4.32

Yes Yes

Gas electricity Gas or electricity

25 36

30 21

12.7 21

4.5 8.5

PERFORMANCE COMPARISON OF 15 TRANSPORT VENTILATORS

Table 1.

Sophisticated Univent Eagle 754 VersaMed iVent

Newport HT50

Pulmonetic Systems LTV 1000

Simple

Oceanic Medical Products Magellan

Bio-Med Devices IC2A Pneupac Parapac Medic

Pneupac Parapac Transport 200D

Life Support Products Auto Vent 2000

Carevent ATVVortran RespirTech Pro Percussionaire TXP Bio-Med Devices Crossvent 3

Bird Avian Pneupac Compac 200

FIO2 fraction of inspired oxygen PEEP positive end-expiratory pressure A/C assist/control SIMV synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation VP volume-controlled and pressure-controlled modes available PSV pressure support ventilation CPAP continuous positive airway pressure CMV controlled mechanical ventilation IMV intermittent mandatory ventilation

A / C , S I M V

A/C (VP), SIMV (VP), PSV, CPAP

A/C (VP), SIMV (VP), PSV, CPAP

A/C (VP), SIMV (VP), PSV, CPAP

CMV, IMV

A/C, SIMV CMV, SIMV CMV, SIMV

CMV

CMV, IMV CMV, IMV CMV, IMV

A/C (VP), SIMV (VP), PSV, CPAP

A/C, SIMV CMV, IMV

Comparison of Evaluated Ventilators by Power Source, Physical Dimensions, Modes, FIO

2, and PEEP

Ventilator

Size

Weight

Height Width Depth

(kg)

Approved

as

Power

Transport

Requirement

Available Modes

1.0

Yes, 0–30

0.5, 1.0

No

0.5, 1.0

No

0.21–1.0

Yes, 0–20

0.21–1.0

Yes, 0–20

0.6, 1.0

Yes, 0–20

1.0

No

0.5

No

0.5, 1.0

No

0.21–1.0

Yes, 0–30

0.21–1.0

Yes, 0–30

1.0

No

1.0

No

0.45, 1.0

No

FIO (range or available values) 2

PEEP Available? (range cm H2O)

1.0

No

Fifth, they should be able to provide both assisted and controlled ventilation. Sixth, they must incorporate alarms that identify catastrophic conditions.

Previous evaluations of transport ventilators included only up to 8 ventilators.4 –10 Many of the ventilators pre- viously evaluated have since been modified by the man- ufacturers, and new ventilators have entered the market. We present an evaluation of 15 transport ventilators for use during intrahospital or ambulance transport and in for- ward military positions. The goals of this study were (1) to determine if these transport ventilators could ventilate both healthy and injured lungs, and deliver tidal volumes (VT) and respiratory rates (RR) as specifically set, and (2) to identify which ventilators would be most appropriate in which transport settings.

Methods

Table 1 shows power requirements, physical dimen-

sions, available modes, available FIO2 ranges and settings, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) range for the 15 tested ventilators. All 15 ventilators were provided by their respective manufacturers specifically for this evalu- ation. All 15 ventilators are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in transport, except the Vor- tran RespirTech Pro, which is marketed as a resuscitator.

Bench Protocol

We evaluated gas consumption, battery life, ease of use, physical characteristics, need for compressed gas, and the ability to deliver set ventilation parameters under 3 differ- ent test conditions. Gas consumption was defined as the amount of time the ventilator could function on one full E-size oxygen cylinder (capacity 660 L of oxygen), with the ventilator set to deliver a VT of 1,000 mL at an RR of 10 breaths/min and an FIO2 of 1.0. Battery life was defined

RESPIRATORY CARE JUNE 2007 VOL 52 NO 6

741

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