X hits on this document

1016 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

136 / 370

129

These designations which will not fit in any of the tradi- tional categories are best described as derivative and non- traditional.5

The following discussion of derivative enemies in wisdom literature focuses primarily on derivative and non- traditional enemies. Occasionally, some of the derivative, but traditional, enemies will be discussed, but most of these do not require discussion since they present no features which have not already appeared in the preceding chapter.

Proverbs Among the five categories of traditional enemies the

fwr-group is presented in Proverbs as acting across the whole spectrum of enemy behavior.6 This broad distribution

5 A complete listing of the "Derivative, but Tradi- tional" and "Derivative and Non-Traditional Enemy Designa- tions" may be found in "Appendix III: Derivative Enemy Designations."

6 Ruppert, pp. 110-179, categorizes enemy behavior within the Psalms in two major categories ("More or Less Concrete Terms" and "More or Less Picturesque Terms"),the first of which falls into seven subgroups which he designates "Utter- ances of Malicious Pleasure, Scorn, Abuse and Hate"; "Terms for Being Overwhelming, Domineering and Striving to Destroy"; "Terms for Perversion of Law and Oppression"; "Terms for Scheming, Intrigues, Slandering and False Accusation"; "Terms for Inquisitorial Behavior"; "Presumption, Arrogance, Temporary or only Feared Triumph"; and "Defection from Friends and Kinfolk"; and the second which falls into three subgroups which he designates "Picturesque Words from Hunting Terminology"; "Terminology Drawn Mainly from War"; and "From the Sphere of Descriptions of Wild Beasts." The present

Document info
Document views1016
Page views1016
Page last viewedSun Dec 11 00:21:02 UTC 2016
Pages370
Paragraphs4563
Words81467

Comments