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procedure is compounded by uncertainties over how much "weight" should be given to various characters or themes. The question of "giving weight" to various characters or themes is fundamentally dependent upon "artistic" judgments. Dogmatism is ruled out of bounds by the book of Job.

Therefore, the following discussion will be organized around the responses which the characters of the book make to their various enemies. Of course, every character in the book is (allegedly) an enemy to somebody at some point. Attention Its best focused, however, on the responses of the friends, Elihu, Job and God.

The Friends Job's friends are introduced in the prologue (2:11-13) when they "made an appointment together to come to condole

(dvn) with him and comfort (MHn) him" (2:11). Upon

seeing him, their first response was to mourn (2:12). Then they sat with him in silence for seven days and nights, "for they saw that his suffering was very great" (2:13).

In prologue, of course, Job is not yet considered an enemy by the friends. He poses no threat. He is simply

H. Rowley, Job (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1980); N. Tur- Sinai, The Book of Job: A New Commentary (Jerusalem: Kiryath Sepher, 1957J; G. Fohrer, Das Buch Hiob (Guersloh: Verlagshaus Gerd Mohn, 1963); E. Dhorme, A Commentary the Book of Job, trans. by H. Knight (London: Nelson, 196).

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