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you less than your guilt deserves" (11:6c). Eliphaz' indictment, however, is the clearest example of this reasoning.

Is not your wickedness great? For there is no end to your iniquities. For you have exacted pledges of your brothers for nothing, and stripped the naked of their clothing. You have given no water to the weary to drink, and you have withheld bread from the The man with power possessed the land, and the favored man dwelt in it. You have sent widows away empty, and the arms of the fatherless were crushed. Therefore snares are round about you, and sudden terror overwhelms you; your light is darkened, so that you cannot see, and a flood of waters covers you. Job 22:5-11

How does Eliphaz know that Job is guilty of these offenses? They are nowhere mentioned. Indeed, if this is the kind of person Job is, then it is curious that the friends came to see him in the first place. Actually, of course, Eliphaz has only a single piece of "evidence" for these crimes. Job's present situation in the midst of suffering, terror and chaos (vv. 10-11) forms the ideo- logical basis justifying the allegations against Job.

Finding his theory of Divine justice contra- dicted by the facts, Eliphaz proceeds to the time-honored device of adjusting the facts to the theory. Accordingly, he invents a long catalogue of crimes committed by Job. 69

69

Gordis, p. 238.

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