X hits on this document

77 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

2 / 20

2

Member Agency Communities in Schools

Reagan Elementary Carol Jolly, Campus Manager

One family served by Reagan Elementary lost their dad to cancer in September, so we added the four children to our Food 4 Kids program. Their dad was the only bread winner. Our entire school pulled together to help them and we continue to serve them each week.

We receive food from the North Texas Food Bank and put them in back packs for the children to take home each weekend. I put together a team of 6th graders to learn “job skills” that help me unload, collate, pack, and distribute backpacks each

week. They learn concepts such as “teamwork” and “taking inventory”. Teachers, as well as parents of this team, support their efforts in working for Food 4 Kids.

Students look forward to receiving their backpacks and when they see us at the classroom door, they jump up spontaneously and greet us as if

they were receiving a present.

when people think of poverty and hunger, images of underdeveloped countries in other parts of the world come to mind.

BUT HUNGER IS ON OUR DOORSTEP.

In North Texas alone, approximately 13 percent of people in the Food Bank’s 13-county service area live below the poverty line.

HUNGER IS A CONDITION OF POVERTY.

Forty-six percent of households with hungry children in Texas are considered “working poor” with at least one adult having a job, but not earning enough to pay rent and buy food.

EMPLOYMENT DOESN’T ALWAYS SAVE THEM FROM HUNGER.

There are hungry people all around us. They come from different walks of life, but they all need the same thing: nourishment to keep going for another day.

THEY ARE OUR NEIGHBORS.

Hundreds of thousands of pounds of food are wasted in North Texas each day. Our goal at the North Texas Food Bank is to stop this waste. It is our responsibility to collect and redistribute food to the families, children, seniors and individuals who would otherwise have none. Those we do reach are so very grateful.

“It has changed our lives. It’s a big help to me and my daughter,” says Mildred, the mother of five-year-old Brianna. The pair was homeless until a North Texas Food Bank Member Agency gave them a place to call home and food to eat.

Having enough to eat also means better performances at work and at school for North Texans of all ages.

“Now [that I’m not hungry] I’m not tired and I don’t fall asleep in class and I’m not grouchy,” says Jesse, an at-risk teen who lives in a transitional housing program operated by a North Texas Food Bank Member Agency. He is able to eat at least three nutritious meals a day through the Food Bank program.

Senior citizens living in our community are one of the groups most at risk of hunger because of the high cost of medications and the fact that many are on a fixed income.

“I have worked my whole life and I still don’t have enough food to eat,” says Elida. She got her first job when she was nine years old and never took a break. She worked two and three jobs at a time to raise her five children alone after her husband died. Now her only income is Social Security. Elida spends most weekdays at a Food Bank Member Agency for senior citizens where she and other low income seniors receive nutritious meals to provide for themselves.

Hundreds of thousands of our neighbors like Mildred, Jesse and Elida are experiencing the transformative power of full stomachs because of North Texas Food Bank programs and its Member Agencies.

These life-changes would not be possible without the gracious support of the foundations, corporations and individuals who love their neighbors enough to feed them.

Thank you for opening your hearts to our neighbors in need.

Document info
Document views77
Page views77
Page last viewedFri Jan 20 03:59:42 UTC 2017
Pages20
Paragraphs553
Words12231

Comments