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Appendix IV. Field data sheets, codes, etc.

Appendix IV. Field data sheets, codes, etc.

Actual (A): Something that is a known source of pollution, and causes, or is capable of causing, a violation of NSSP bacteriological standards for approved shellfish growing waters during the time of observation. For beaches and other areas these are sources that contribute to bacteria levels above the EPA-approved standards for recreational water. A source can only be described as ‘Actual’ if: (1) It has been found to have consistently high bacteria levels; and/or (2) It is determined, beyond a reasonable doubt, that the source is polluting, or capable of polluting, the surrounding area (e.g., a sewage treatment plant outfall, straight pipe, malfunctioning septic system). Additional source tracking and identifi- cation tools may be necessary to verify “Actual” status. For DMR Sanitary Shoreline Surveys of shellfish growing areas, actual pollution sources must be re-sampled and re-evaluated at least once every three years.

Potential (P): Any source that has the potential to infrequently and/or unpredictably release contaminants to the sur- rounding shellfish growing waters at levels which are in violation of NSSP bacteriological standards. For beaches and other areas these are sources that contribute to bacteria levels above the EPA-approved standards for recreational water. During an initial shoreline survey all sources found will be classified as potential until further bacterial investigations and verification can be conducted. For DMR Sanitary Shoreline Surveys of shellfish growing areas, potential pollution sources must be re-evaluated, through sampling or other means, at least once every three years.

Direct (D): proceeding in a straight line or by the shortest course; straight; undeviating. Indirect (I): not in a direct course or path; deviating from a straight line; roundabout.

Potential – Low Priority: Any pollution source found which meets the definition of ‘Potential’ and for which there is no likely means of abatement. Low priority sources will not be followed up in as much detail or as quickly as ‘Potential’ sources. These are sources that, due to distance or dilution, may not significantly impact coastal water quality. For DMR Sanitary Shoreline Surveys of shellfish growing areas, Potential – Low Priority pollution sources must be re-evaluated, through sampling or other means, at least once every three years.

Animal Farm Runoff (AF): Water originating from an area where animals are raised and/or housed and flows untreated into streams or other surface waters.

In-ground septic field (IG): The specific type of system and further details should be documented in the Pollution Source Description box.

Intermittent Stream (IS): A freshwater stream that flows only during periods of precipitation or snow melt. Stream is dry during certain periods of the year.

Malfunctioning Septic System (MS): A septic system that is not performing according to its design specifications. Can cause/be detected by overland flow or groundwater seeps near a leach field, ponding or breakout of wastewater, seepage into building, discharge into nearby surface waters.

Outhouse (OH): An outdoor toilet not connected to any type of septic system or wastewater treatment plant.

Perennial Stream (Steady Stream) (SS): A freshwater stream that flows continually during the entire year with the exception of periods of extreme drought or when frozen.

Town system (TS): Municipal, public or otherwise communal system that moves sewage to a central treatment plant.

Pipe: a man-made conduit through which liquid can flow. This does not include road culverts. Types of pipes include:

AP Active straight pipe CD Cellar drain

IP Inactive straight pipe LD Land drain

GD Gutter drain

OD Licensed overboard discharge

PD Pool drain SD Sink drain

SO Septic overflow pipe WO Well overflow

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