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A CONSERVATION ASSESMENT OF THE TERRESTRIAL ECOREGIONS OF LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN The World Bank - WWF (Dinerstein et al. 1995)

This priority-setting study elevates, as first principle, maintaining the representation of all ecosystem and habitat types in regional investment portfolios. Second, it recognizes landscape- level features as an essential guide for effective conservation planning.

The goals of this study are:

  • 1)

    To replace the relatively ad hoc decision making process of donors investing in biodiversity conservation with a more transparent and scientific approach.

  • 2)

    To move beyond evaluations based largely on species lists to a new framework that also incorporates maintaining ecosystem and habitat diversity.

  • 3)

    To better integrate the principles of conservation biology and landscape ecology into decision making.

  • 4)

    To ensure that proportionately more funding be channeled to areas that are of high biological value.

The study biogeographic approach divides Latin America and the Caribbean in 5 major ecosystem types, 11 major habitat types and 178 ecoregions (excluding 13 mangrove complexes of which 5 or 38% are present in Mexico), 50 of these ecoregions or 28% of them are present in

Mexico.

The conservation

assessment

integrates two fundamental

data

layers:

(A)

biological

distinctiveness and (B) conservation status, into an overall (C) biodiversity priority ranking. Fourteen ecoregions present in Mexico are considered to be of the highest priority at a regional scale.

(A) 1= Globally Outstanding, 2 =Regionally Outstanding, 3 =Bioregionally Outstanding, 4 =Locally Important

(B)

C = Critical,

E = Endangered,

V = Vulnerable,

S = Relatively Stable,

I = Relatively Intact

(C) I = Highest Priority at Regional Scale, II = High Priority at Regional Scale, III = Moderate Priority at Regional Scale, IV = Important at National Scale,

  • *

    indicates ecoregions elevated at level Ia priority ranking to achieve better bioregional representation.

(- AB/C)

TROPICAL BROADLEAF FORESTS Tropical Moist Broadleaf Forests

  • 7.

    - Oaxacan moist forest - 3E/II

  • 8.

    - Tehuantepec moist forests - 3E/II*

  • 9.

    - Yucatán moist forest - 3V/III

  • 10.

    - Sierra Madre moist forest - 3E/II

  • 11.

    - Central American montane forest - 3E/II

12.- Belizean Swamp Forests - 4E/III Tropical Dry Broadleaf Forests

(marginally mapped for Mexico)

  • 64.

    - Baja California dry forests - 4S/IV

  • 65.

    - Sinaloan dry forests - 3V/III

  • 66.

    - Tamaulipas/Veracruz dry forests - 4E/III*

  • 67.

    - Jalisco dry forests - 2E/I

  • 68.

    - Balsas dry forests - 2E/I

  • 69.

    - Oaxacan dry forests - 3E/II

  • 70.

    - Veracruz dry forests - 4C/III

  • 71.

    - Yucatán dry forests - 4E/III

  • 72.

    - Central American Pacific dry forests - 3C/II (included in map not in text)

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