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WESTERN HEMISPHERE SHOREBIRD RESERVE NETWORK (WHSRN)

WHSRN sites are those staging areas that are of highest priority in the hemispheric conservation

of shorebirds. Current biological criteria identify 3 levels of habitat where shorebirds concentrate and are at high vulnerability.

use believed Additionally,

to represent sites as a voluntary,

nonregulatory program, WHSRN requires that sites have full support public and private land owners, local communities and organizations.

of

all

stakeholders,

including

  • -

    Hemispheric Sites - Area hosts at least 500,000 shorebirds annually or 30% of the species flyway population based on peak species counts.

  • -

    International Sites - Area hosts at least 100,000 shorebirds annually or 10% of the species flyway population based on peak species counts.

  • -

    Regional Sites - Area hosts at least 20,000 shorebirds annually or 5% of the species flyway

population based on peak species counts.

Current review of these criteria is considering a method for including vital breeding and wintering areas where shorebirds may not be highly concentrated and relatively dispersed staging areas such as complexes of smaller inland wetlands (prairie potholes, etc.).

(http://www.manomet.org/Wetlands/criteria.htm, 04/2000)

The following list includes registered sites and projects based on data produced by Guy Morrison's surveys, which is also being used by DUMAC for their Mexican Shorebird Conservation Plan (Jim Corven pers. com.).

Marismas Nacionales, Nay., Sin Estuario del Rio Colorado B.C. Son. Laguna Madre (first Bi-National Site) Tex. Tamps. Guerrero Negro, B.C.S. Bahia de Santa Maria, Sin

(International WHSRN site) (International WHSRN site) (International WHSRN site) (International WHSRN site) (Site of current WHSRN project)

MEXICAN SHOREBIRD CONSERVATION PLAN - DRAFT

Wetland Complexes with Substantial Numbers of Shorebirds DUMAC

Shorebirds are a relatively diverse group that utilize habitats as varied as shallow estuaries, emergent marsh, mudflats, wet meadows, floded agricultural fields and pastures. Only the deepest (>20 cm) and most densely vegetated wetlands are little used by most shorebirds. Populations of many shorebirds species are declining. In fact, 21 of the approximately 50 species of shorebird commonly occuring in North America have documented population declines.

For the following “Highly Imperiled” and “High Concern” shorebird species, habitats in Mexico constitute an important proportion of the species range: Charadrius alexandrinus (Snowy Plover), Charadrius montanus (Mountain Plover), Charadrius wilsonia (Wilson’s Plover), Aphriza virgata (Surfbird), Limosa fedoa (Marbled Godwit), Haematopus palliatus (American Oystercatcher), Arenaria melanocephala (Black Turnstone).

For the following “Highly Imperiled” and “High Concern” shorebird species, habitats in Mexico constitute a substantial proportion of the species range: Charadrius melodus (Piping Plover), Numenius americanus (Long-billed Curlew), Numenius phaeopus (Whimbrel), Arenaria interpres (Rudy Turnstone), Phalaropus tricolor (Wilson’s Phalarope), Calidris alba (Sanderling), Haematopus bachmani (Black Oystercatcher), Limosa haemastica (Hudsonian Godwit).

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