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that time. The family left FL for DE prior to 1790, for son Solomon was born in NJ in 1790. Thomas is on the tax assessment list for 1804 in New Castle. Because wife Lois is the taxpayer of record in 1807, I assume Thomas died prior to that year. At the time of the 1830 U. S. census there was a female age 70-80 living with Stephen Poinsett; this probably was Lois.

7 - Uriah Poinsett - 813 (abt 1788 - < 1850) may

present-day

Jacksonville,

FL.

(Oliveros

gives

have been born at Cow Uriah's birth also as

Ford, which is near 1790; his brother,

Solomon, almost certainly was born and probably was born about 1788.)

in 1790 in

NJ; I

(Daughter

Mary

believe Uriah was the older of the two from Uriah's second marriage indicates

in the 1885 FL census that her father was according to Oliveros (1980). The earliest

born in account

FL.) Uriah for Uriah in

married Ann Egbert - 814, DE is a 1809 tax record. He

probably was just 21 years profession that he continued

of age in in DE and

that

year.

By

1814

Uriah was

later

in and

out

of FL

for several

a ship's captain, a years. His address

in the Uriah 1820, seems

Wilmington directory in 1814 was 41 E. Front Street. I found a baptismal record for and Ann's 4-month-old daughter, Harriot (Harriet), in Wilmington, DE, for 27 Jun at the Asbury M. E. Church, which places Uriah and family in DE that year. Uriah to have disappeared from DE prior to 1830, as he is not in the census there for that

year nor for 1840. where he had been

I believe that his wife, Ann, had born and where the family may

died have

and

Uriah returned

to reside in

FL

still

held property.

Uriah was

the

captain Florida

of the steamboat waters. This was

"Santee” in 1837-1840 and the "William at the time of the Second Seminole Indian

Gaston" in

1839-40 in

War. (The

information

here on steamboating Poinsett in Mueller's sidewheelers, built in

is from Mueller, 1986; Uriah is erroneously recorded as “Josiah”

work.)

Both

the

SANTEE

and

WILLIAM

GASTON

were

Charleston

in

1835

and

1837

respectively,

which

also

was

their

homeport. The WILLIAM GASTON was abandoned in 1858. On 17 Jan 1838, proceeding from Savannah to Florida, the SANTEE and the steamboat DARIEN, en northbound, collided in St. Catherine's Sound. There was a thick fog at the time.

while route The

DARIEN casualties some 169

sank soon after the collision, part of her deck being under water. Fortunately, no resulted and the SANTEE was able to proceed. The Sloop OTHELLO took off bales of cotton from the DARIEN and carried them to Savannah. On 15 Nov 1838

the 113 ton JOHN McLEAN, on charter to the Army, stranded going ashore about sunset in the breakers and becoming a total

on the bar at Mosquito Inlet, loss. However, all on board

were They

saved were

by the SANTEE which came by two days later and rescued the crew and troops. near destitute after the wreck but managed to reach St. Augustine, courtesy the

SANTEE on 18 Nov. Some of the to St. Augustine by the SANTEE.

JOHN McLEAN's machinery was In January, 1839, the SANTEE,

salvaged and brought under Captain Uriah

Poinsett, came from Black Creek to St. Augustine with troops. The SANTEE made three trips between Key Biscayne, St. Augustine, and Black Creek in March of 1839. there were three round trips between Indian River, St. Augustine, and Black Creek.

at least In May In July

she visited Key Biscayne, Key West, and October the WILLIAM GASTON, piloted Biscayne with Army troops and passengers,

Tampa, sailing out of St. Augustine. In late by Uriah, arrive in St. Augustine from Key including Col. William Selby Harney. She had

to put back to Key Biscayne for fuel Canaveral because of severe weather.

(wood) and made a harbor entrance twice at Cape Uriah had business associations in Jacksonville, FL,

29

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