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Protect the Natural Dune Seawall - page 8 / 11

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on the south end of the beach.” This apparently is with the blessing of the GLO. There has been a turnover of GLO staff and they don’t seem to grasp the seriousness of the situation and the fact that critical coppice dunes which are protected by state law are being destroyed. If a private party was to remove that sand or disturb that vegetation they would get a very heavy fine. A few years ago a tourist in a rented beach buggy was fined over $1000 for driving over a very small amount of vegetation in the very same area that the city is removing it with heavy equipment.

At the very time that the city is transporting sand from the upper beach back to the water to be washed south of town forever, one can see that the waves from Katrina and Rita have eroded our

beach down 2 or 3 ft along the line of traffic control posts! The wind is trying to replace the sand eroded by those storms and to build the dunes and the vegetation seaward and the city

is throwing that

away.

Other

precious sand municipalities

along the Texas coast, Gilchrist, Galveston,

including Surfside,

North Padre

Padre Island,

Island

are

and South spending

millions of dollars to put sand on their upper beaches.

Every bit of sand that is removed from the

critical

coppice

dune

area

and

the

upper

beach

is

sand

that

a

hurricane

would

have

to

remove

before it could attack the main dune ridge and our homes.

That sand prevents small storms from

damaging the main dune line and delays major storm attack on the main dune line.

Over decades

the

sand

that

is

being

thrown

away

in

the

water

can

build

a

strong

and

complete

dune

ridge

adding to our natural dune seawall. natural system provides at no cost?

Why would we want to throw away storm protection that the

Our Beach Management Program is EXPENSIVE!

It costs a lot of money to continually scrape our upper beach so that cars can drive where dunes want to form. Just last week, I drove from Avenue G in Port Aransas to the Fish Pass. It was tough going along the wide beach in the photo above and I nearly got stuck a couple of times even though my truck has wide tires. From the Aransas Princess Condominium all the way to the Fish Pass, it was easy driving on the hard packed wet beach. In the section where a fortune is being spent moving sand, the driving was difficult and where the beach has much less “maintenance” the driving was easy. We are spending a fortune to unsuccessfully maintain a driving lane in the nursery where critical dunes form and weakening the future of our natural dune seawall at the same time. There is a better way! Port Aransas can surely find a better use for the money that is being spent moving vast amounts of sand.

8

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