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ideal form, an SDR handset would access any radio signal floating in the air −− walkie−talkies, Bluetooth, HAM radio, TV programs, cordless phones, radio, Internet and remote control toys, to name a few. The military and emergency services grasped the benefits and have been driving the technology. In Europe, the European Defense Agency has provided nearly $130 million for a five−country joint research project aimed at enhancing SDR. Rescue services are expected to be early adopters. In a disaster, when tight coordination is essential, one device could communicate with a police radio, with first responders using walkie−talkies or with cell phones. Source: http://www.edn.com/article/CA6470301.html

31. August 20, USA TODAY Atlanta becomes a template for improving emergency services. When the emergency medical system in Atlanta, GA, needed rescuing, Mayor Shirley Franklin started issuing orders that have resulted in lifesaving changes to the city’s emergency system. She began looking for ways to hold emergency crews more accountable, and last year she ordered all 8,000 city employees −− including herself −− to be trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Thanks to those efforts and a program created in Atlanta by Emory University and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention, the city is saving more residents who collapse of sudden cardiac arrest. Since September 2005, the survival rate for such patients in Atlanta has jumped from less than three percent to 15 percent. That's well above the six to 10 percent survival rate for most cities that was identified in a 2003 analysis by USA TODAY. The program −− known as Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival, or CARES −− is a five−year, $1.5 million CDC project launched three years ago. It was partly inspired by the USA TODAY investigation, which found that emergency medical systems in most of the nation's 50 largest cities were fragmented, inconsistent, and slow. S o u r c e : h t t p : / / w w w . u s a t o d a y . c o m / n e w s / h e a l t h / 2 0 0 7 0 8 2 0 e m s a t l a n t a _ N . h t m

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Information Technology and Telecommunications Sector

32. August 21, IDG News Service Gunplay blamed for Internet slowdown. Internet service providers in the U.S. experienced a service slowdown Monday, August 20, after fiber optic cables near Cleveland were apparently sabotaged by gunfire. TeliaSonera AB, which lost the northern leg of its U.S. network to the cut, said that the outage began around 4 p.m. EDT Sunday night. When technicians pulled up the affected cable, it appeared to have been shot. "Somebody had been shooting with a gun or a shotgun into the cable," said Anders Olausson, a TeliaSonera spokesperson. The damage affected a large span of cable, more than two−thirds of a mile long, near Cleveland, TeliaSonera said. The company declined to name the service provider whose lines had been cut. Source: http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewA rticleBasic&articleId=9031758&intsrc=news_ts_head

33. August 20, eWeek Skype blackout fixed, caused by massive PC restart. The blackout that left millions of Skype users without the ability to make Internet phone calls from their PCs for two days was, ironically, triggered by the service's users. Skype spokesperson Villu Arak wrote in a blog post Monday, August 20, that the outage, which was resolved August 18, happened after a massive restart of its users' computers across the globe as they "re−booted after receiving


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