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gift to humanity,” he said (quoted in Barnes 2003, God and Man in the Oval Office). In

contemplating his administration’s geopolitical vision for America’s future, Bush

frequently emphasizes the importance of morality in defining the country’s role in the

world:

There is a value system that cannot be compromised – God-given values. These aren’t United States-created values. These are values of freedom and the human condition and mothers loving their children. What’s very important as we articulate foreign policy through our diplomacy and military action is that it never looks like we are creating – we are the author of these values” (quoted in Woodward 2002, 131).

The full scope of the Bush Doctrine is laid out in Present Dangers: Crisis and

Opportunity in American Foreign and Defense Policy (2000), a collection of works

providing the blueprint of Bush’s foreign policy plan (Barry 2002, PNAC’S Present

Dangers). In Present Dangers, William J. Bennett contended that U.S. foreign policy

needed a strong moral component29 that should not be strictly defined by national or

economic interests (Barry 2002, PNAC’S Present Dangers). In addition, Deputy

Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz added that America’s moral vision must marry the

ability “to take a hard-headed and clear-eyed view of the world” (Kagan and Kristol

2000, 335).

29 Like the president, particular “hardliners” (e.g. Paul Wolfowtiz and Richard Perle) within the Bush arsenal also promote the use of military force to achieve “moral clarity.” This policy is comprehensively laid out in Present Dangers (2000).

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