X hits on this document

PDF document

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO - page 31 / 50

111 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

31 / 50

post-Cold War globe.46 In the old Westerns, the cowboy was the man who restored the

“disturbed” universe by self-asserting universal justice; Fishwick wrote that the cowboy

“conjures up an image of America’s untarnished natural nobleman roaming about in [his]

never-never land, where [he] makes the laws and metes out the justice” (Fishwick 1952,

91). Akin to cowboy ethics, the Bush Doctrine supports the responsibility of the United

States to administer justice and preserve the peace (The White House 2002, v).

Violence becomes a way of solving problems (Savage 1979, 32). Like the cowboy, the

Bush Doctrine asserts that the United States must retain its freedom to act against serious

dangers in order to protect its people and others from harm. In an interview with

Woodward, Bush questioned how the civilized world could just stand by while evil

dictators abuse their people (Woodward 2002, 340). “Maybe it’s my religion, but I feel

passionate about this,” he explained. “We will extend the peace by encouraging free and

open societies on every continent,” the president promised in his West Point speech on

June 1, 2002 (The White House 2002, 1).

46 Slotkin believed that the cowboy was a mythic archetype that became transformed into an ideology justifying America’s role as the “watchdog of the World” after WWII (Walle 2000, 50).

28

Document info
Document views111
Page views111
Page last viewedFri Oct 28 22:16:03 UTC 2016
Pages50
Paragraphs971
Words15956

Comments