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Correct inscription “EΠI” at left, error “ENI” right.

of the various banks which had originally prepared the notes for destruction. They are actually rather rare and difficult to find today – but don't expect to find one in anything above poor to good condition!

as

Picture title noted in The

inconsistencies are Standard Catalog

to be found only on two notes (Pick 117 and 120)

of

World

Paper

Money.

Both

inconsistencies

occurred on German occupation notes. In the first 1941, the picture caption was originally engraved

instance, upon the

the 1000 drachma note of illustration of a waterfall

upon the reverse of the note. This resulted in this, the printer modified the reverse plate so a “box” with a white background, making

a rather indistinguishable title. To rectify that the picture title was contained within

the

title

plainly

legible.

In

the

second

example, a 10,000 drachma treasury on the reverse, the

note depicting a farm same situation arose

couple on when the

its obverse and the original engraving

Athenian produced

an obscure the caption

title. This in order to

was rectified in the same way, by producing make it stand out from the background.

a

shadow

box

around

The Greek inflation series does not employ watermarked paper with but one exception that I know of. This contradiction occurs on the 5,000 drachma issue of 20 June 1942, (Pick 119). Most 5,000 drachma notes do not contain a watermark. Those with a watermark were printed on paper consisting of rows of adjoining circles and lines giving it an overall “honeycomb” effect. This is the same watermark that may be found on Greek agricultural treasury bonds and, perhaps, other fiscal paper. Whether the watermarked paper ended up on Greek bank notes intentionally or by accident is one of pure speculation. If by accident, perhaps through carelessness, the wrong paper could have been withdrawn from treasury stock; if on purpose, perhaps the move was dictated by a shortage of un-watermarked paper at the Treasury.

Another interesting deviation appears on the 200 million drachma note of 9 September 1944 (Pick 131). This takes the form of two different under-prints. On the more common the under-print consists of a lathe work containing alternate horizontal rows of open and shaded oval, similar to a cotton “Q tip” in appearance. The scarcer version consists of interconnecting circles and dots.

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