X hits on this document

PDF document

My Potential Patients: Origins, Detection, and Transference in - page 5 / 69

164 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

5 / 69

Cohen 2

Blacl<well

Berman,

take

As J.P. Shute, Jeffrey

Geoffrey Green, and Stephen

note, critics have tended to

Nabokov's treatment of Freud at face value,

all

regarding it as either "yet another harmless hobbyhorse, the favorite foible of a

notoriously opinionated author" (Shute

637),

the unassailable gospel of the master

(Berman

214 and Green 2), or an unambiguous embodiment of his project to exalt

individual experience and imagination over massive, impersonal abstraction

(Blackwell 136). At the same time, there is no agreement on the extent of Nabokov's

knowledge of psychoanalysis (Andrews

7),'

an irresolvable ambiguity Nabokov

perhaps intentionally cultivated by his non-committal admission of

"boolush

familiarity" with the subject (Strong Opinions 23).

Shute makes a particularly good case for giving the issue more serious

consideration, proposing in her 1984 article, "Nabokov and Freud: The Play of

Power," that Nabokov's campaign against Freud is at its core a reaction of the literary

text against the act of interpretation. Shute grounds her argument in a bold assertion

of Nabokov and Freud's affinity, a claim adopted as the foundation of most

subsequent discussions. Noting

Nabolcov's

association of psychoanalysis and

fascism, Shute asserts that Nabokov in fact takes issue with "all totalitarianism of

meaning, all systems that claim to have captured and colonized truth" and that stifle

as a result the delicate intricacy of individual imagination, memory, and desire (640).

1 J.P. Shute argues that Nabokov knew Freud well, citing biographer Andrew Field and quoting from a letter to Edmund Wilson that mocks an obscure bit of Freudiana: "In one of his letters to Fliess, the Viennese Sage mentions a young patient who masturbated in the of an Interlaken hotel in a special contracted position so as to be able to glimpse (now comes the Viennese Sage's curative explanation) the Jungfrau" (qtd. in Shute 638). In a 2003 article, Stephen Blackwell presents evidence suggesting that Nabokov's hatred of Freud was a longstanding preoccupation, citing an anonymous 1919 letter to

w.c.

the

Cambridge

Review mocking psychoanalysis and bearing some signatures devices of Nabokovian

prose ("Weiner-schnitzel" 131-32).

Document info
Document views164
Page views164
Page last viewedSun Dec 04 01:58:21 UTC 2016
Pages69
Paragraphs2108
Words19252

Comments