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57 / 143

Total

62%

29

30%

White Black Hispanic Asian

61% 65% 64% 70%

30 29 30 19

27% 39% 38% 38%

Male Female

61% 63%

30 28

26% 34%

45-49 50-55

63% 62%

30 30

27% 33%

HS diploma or less Some college College grad Post grad work

62% 64% 63% 60%

30 28 29 34

36% 31% 26% 20%

< $30K $30K-<$50K $50K-<$75K $75K-100K $100K or more

61% 63% 62% 63% 66%

30 31 31 30 26

37% 31% 29% 27%

26%

Caregivers of parents/children Caregivers for elders

65% 75%

29 21

31% 40%

Sandwiched between parents/children

62%

32

26%

35

21

9

29

19

9

24 32 33 36 40

19 22 21 22

11 9 10 8

18

8

34

20

9

35

13

8

36

22

10

26

19

11

33

20

8

37

20

9

40

27

7

AARP Multicultural Survey July 2001

36

20

10

29

21

9

34

21

9

26

18

11

26

20

10

32

14

5

Table 25: Parents’ Care Expectations by Demographic Characteristics

Q24. I do or did more for my parents than they expect: Please tell me if you agree strongly, agree somewhat, disagree strongly or disagree somewhat with each of these statements:

Agree

Disagree

Disagree Smwht Strngly

20

9

Agree Strngly

Smwht 32

Irrespective of the extent to which older boomers may believe they have matched their parents’ hopes, the internal standards of obligation (or perhaps guilt) shared by many may render a harsher verdict. The pattern of responses in table 26 portrays a generation evenly split, 48% to 47%, on whether they should do more or should have done more for their parents. Such remorse is most rampant among Asian Americans, (72% say they should do more) followed by Hispanics (65%).

Other differences may be attributable to gender and income. Men and poorer people are most inclined to feel they should do more for their older relatives.

Prepared for AARP by Belden Russonello & Stewart and Research/Strategy/Management Page 48

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