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R O B E RT B A S F O R D

AUG. 21, 1923–MAR. 11, 2007

Basford

R obert Basford enjoyed life as a scientist so much that it would surprise many who knew him to learn that his formal education nearly came to an end after high school. The North Dakota native told his students that he danced in the street for coins during the Great Depression. As a young man, he was an office manager before starting college. He received his PhD from the University of Washington in 1951 and spent

five years on fellowships at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

His career at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine began in 1958, when he joined what was then the Department of Biochemistry. Students and fellows remember him as a hands-on scientist who never hesitated to do the hard work himself or to give credit where credit was due. He was an avid cook and gardener who, with his wife, Carol Phebus-Basford (MD ’68), once invited his lab group over to see his night-blooming cactus. He made important contributions to understanding metabolism in the immune system and in the brain. He was acting chair of his department for four years, beginning in 1976, and retired as an emeritus professor in 1993.

  • Chuck Staresinic

ANDREW KEVERLINE

APR. 13, 1974–JAN. 22, 2007

A round his hometown of Warren, Pa., Andrew Keverline was admired as the charismatic doctor who returned from the city to take over his dad’s ophthalmic practice following the elder Keverline’s death in 2002. Then Andrew Keverline (MD ’00, Res ’04) died this winter in a snowmobile accident in northwestern Pennsylvania. He was 32 years old. Keverline was the fourth in his family to graduate from Pitt’s School of Medicine. He followed his father, Paul Keverline (MD ’69), brother Michael Keverline (MD ’97, Res ’01), and sister-in-law Sharon Keverline (MD ’97, Res ’01). Keverline

’40s

’50s

’60s

ALFRED R. CONTI MD ’44 MAR. 10, 2007

JAMES C. FRIES MD ’50 JAN. 16, 2007

HOWARD B. EISEN MD ’60 MAR. 12, 2007

IN MEMORIAM

KENNETH KOST

ROY E. BOHL

MD ’59

MD ’62

MAR. 28, 2007

OCT. 2, 2006

ROBERT E.

RICHARD W.

ROBERT H.

JOHNSTON

ZIMMERMAN

BROUGHER

MD ’46

RES ’57

MD ’61

DEC. 31, 2;006

JAN. 30, 2007

NOV. 21, 2006

38

PITTMED

BERNARD I. COHEN MD ’64 JAN. 26, 2007

“Andy’s dream was always to go back and practice with our dad,” said Michael Keverline. Their father died one year before that could happen.

“He could have gone anywhere after residency. But he went back [to Warren] nine months after Dad died. Andy was fiercely loyal, and he had a strong sense of responsibility.”

Keverline is survived by his wife and two children, ages 3 and 4.

  • CS

JAMES A. MAGOVERN

JUNE 8, 1954–MAR. 17, 2007

hen James Magovern (MD ’80) was diag- nosed with renal cancer in 2003, he put his surgical practice on hold to devote time to his research and his family. Magovern was the principal investigator on a National Institutes of Health study of a left ventricular device. He was also director of cardiac surgery research at Allegheny General Hospital and surgical director of the hospital’s Gerald R. McGinnis Cardiovascular Institute. Two of his research papers were in press at the time of his death. The father of four hails from an esteemed medical family. His father, George Magovern, was an early leader in developing artificial heart valves. Brother George Jr. received his MD from Pitt in 1978. Daughter Megan is currently in medical school. —CS W Magovern

CAMPBELL MOSES

FEB. 12, 1917–FEB. 11, 2007

A planned birthday party for Campbell Moses (MD ’41) suddenly became a memorial service, but it remained a celebration of his life. Moses died February 11, one day before his 90th birthday.

Moses earned his undergraduate and medical degrees at the University of Pittsburgh. He was a researcher who took part in the clinical trials of Jonas

Moses, c. 1958

Salk’s polio vaccine and an associate professor of physiology and pharmacology. He directed and helped build the Addison H. Gibson Laboratory, which re-established live animal research at Pitt.

Moses left Pittsburgh for New York City in 1967 and became the medical director of the American Heart Association. Peers called Moses a gifted communicator and innovative medical educator who used film as an educational tool as early as 1949. After leaving the association in 1973, he was senior vice presi- dent for medical services at Medicus, a medical communications agency. He was an enthusiastic Manhattanite, frequently walking his adopted city and reveling in the many restaurants, cafes, and neighborhood shops where he was known by name.

Among the fond memorial service remembrances from his four children was a thank-you for demonstrating how to live a “prin- cipled and ethical life” and for “trying hard” to teach a son how to tie a bow tie. One of his 12 grandchildren added, “I am grateful you weren’t afraid to roll around on the floor and be silly. Thank you for keeping tetanus shots in your freezer.” —CS

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