X hits on this document

PDF document

Nuptiality in Latin America: - page 18 / 49

177 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

18 / 49

Nuptiality in Latin America

due to changes or stability among women in different social groups, whether

maintenance or rise is being caused by an increase among rather well-educated

and/or well-to-do young women who are able to postpone childbearing (see also

Parrado and Tienda, forthcoming) or whether any stability or change is

occurring among less educated women whose bargaining has been undermined by a

“marriage

squeeze”

(Greene

and

Rao

1995).

In

any

case,

the

marriage

market

will be changing, and the value placed on different assets will change along

with

it.

Could

it

be

that

formal

marriage

per

se

will

acquire

more

of

a

companionate quality, less of an institutional one (á la Burgess and Locke,

1945)?

The ambivalent attitude toward informal (consensual) union might best be

noted through the fact that many unions that begin informally eventually

become

formalized.

Direct

evidence

on

this

matter

has

been

difficult

to

come

by as even the World Fertility Survey, that was so good in many respects, did

not gather the kind of information on marital histories necessary for

ascertaining the later legalization of a union that began consensually (except

in

Mexico).

But

there

is

some

evidence.

For

instance,

in

looking

at

the

proportion of women in a union who are in a consensual union, that proportion

tends

to

be

much

higher

among

younger

women

than

older

women.

For

instance

in

Colombia (1985) over 41 percent of the women 20-24 who were in a union were in

a

consensual

union.

By

age

45-49,

that

was

only

20

percent.

Figures

for

Peru

(1981) were 40 and 16 percent respectively, and 27 and 15 percent in Paraguay

(1982)

(U.N.

1990

Table

19).

Of

all

the

World

Fertility

Surveys,

the

Mexican

one (EMF) did gather information necessary to construct a life table that

could show the termination of consensual unions because of their conversion

into

legal

unions

(for

women).

Pebley

and

Goldman

(1986,

p.206)

constructed

such a table and found that “in the absence of separation or widowhood, two-

thirds

of

consensual

unions

would

eventually

become

legal

marriages;

...

In

16

Document info
Document views177
Page views177
Page last viewedFri Jan 20 21:01:57 UTC 2017
Pages49
Paragraphs3758
Words11605

Comments