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Beside them, “synergy” and “co-operation” components of transdisciplinarity:

were isolated as two other crucial

((Transdisciplinarity

entails a synergy between contributory

disciplines

  • -

    between

their

conceptual

modes and

information

sets. This synergy, and the resultant

emergent properties

of the

scienttfic discourse and conceptualisation, occur when a diverse mix of scientists research questions that are embedded in dynamic systems (. .))).

are most likely to cooperatively tackle large, complex and

In the end, Prof. McMichael, referring to the characteristics of the ideal participants to a t r a n s d i s c i p l i n a r y r e s e a r c h p r o g r a m m e , h i g h l i g h t e d t h e c o n c e p t s o f w i l l i n g n e s s t o interest and commitment”, trust” as well as “mutual identifying these individual

attitudes as additional crucial components for the success of the endeavour..

***

Furthermore, it has to be mentioned that, in the perspective of transdisciplinarity, Prof.

McMichael, felt the importance of briefly touching the issue of reductionist in Western science. In this view, he stressed how the classical methods

approach of Western

sciences conceive complex wholes as being reductively fractionable in a series of “leg0-like” components to be analyzed in a mono-disciplinary way:

((There have always been complex, multi-faceted, problems for

the classical methods of reductionist. With this the complex whole by parts; we dis-assemble scientists to think Western science reductionism, we separate studies about. However, are explicitly can learn about of its component , Classical science to manageably fractionate, assumes and confine our gaze (...). reducible lego-like world, a

researchable parts. There is no expectation that the whole will behave other than recognisably as the sum of its parts (...))J.

On the contrary, as he urged,

((there is a needfor approaches that can transcend the limited

horizons

of existing

disciplines

and can

look to wider

horizons, complexity,

thereby

accommodating

scale and uncertainty

(. .) M.

new

dimensions

of

He recalled the thoughts of Ravetz and Funtowicz who have described the methods of the “soft-sciences” as

way things

relate and the

way

systems operate,

(...) and

of the

traditional

expectation

that

science should

deliver

final

((free of reductionist and mechanistic assumption about the

precise

estimates

unshrouded

by uncertain@

(. ..) N.

27

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