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MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT AND COMPENSATION IN CHINA - page 72 / 106

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130 Note again that the data for China refer to all employees, while the figures for the United States and other countries refer to production workers. Employees have higher compensation than production workers, so the data for China are overstated to an unknown degree for these comparisons.

131 World Bank. World Development Report 2004: Making Services Work for Poor People (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2003), p. 265. http://econ.worldbank.org/wdr The purchasing power parity exchange rate is a relative price indicator that refers to all the goods and services that go into the GDP.

132 “Economic weight-watching; China’s economy is larger than it looks,” Economist, Sept. 30, 2004.

133

World Bank, World Development Report 2004, pp. 252-253).

134

West, “Pension reform in China,” p. 172.

135

Fox and Zhao, “China’s labor market reform,” p. 37.

136

Thomas G. Rawski, personal communication, May 28, 2004.

137 Section on “Manufacturing employment in China,” subsection on “Migrant manufacturing workers.”

138 Shanghai municipality, for example, excludes from its employment statistics data on in-migrant workers from other provinces, as discussed in the first section of this report, “Manufacturing employment in China,” subsection on “Migrant manufacturing workers.”

139 See Nicholas R. Lardy, “Do China’s abusive labor practices encourage outsourcing and drive down American wages?” testimony presented before the Senate Democratic Policy Committee Hearing, Mar. 29, 2004; on the Internet at http://democrats.senate.gov/dpc/hearings/hearing14/lardy.pdf.

140 Rawski, personal communication, May 28, 2004; Fox and Zhao, “China’s labor market reform,” pp. 3, 22.

141

See the first section of this report, “Manufacturing employment in China,”

table 1.

142

“Is the wakening giant a monster?” The Economist, Feb. 15, 2003, pp. 63-65.

143 George Stalk and Dave Young, “How China gets our business,” Washington Post, Mar. 7, 2004, p. B3.

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