X hits on this document

2 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

1 / 1

2

  

 

1

Standing alone The last of Laredo’s onion farmers, Dietz remains competitive in a fading business



 

3 4 5

A head start: Children from low-income families benefit from development program Building a dream: Nuevo Laredo’s newest industrial park is a ‘city inside a city’ Joe Brand garners award

 

18 Courts in crisis Border initiative overloads federal courts from Texas to California





6

7

9

Border Education Raising expectations: LCC partnership improves access to higher education Border Economy Drug smuggling swells as cross-border trade rises Border Business Russian visitor notes similarities between Laredo and Siberia Family business institute seeking outstanding family firms

10 The drug war: Border agents use high-tech gadgets to keep out drugs







7 8 11 14

15

16 17 19 20

Labor Statistics for Laredo Corporate Kudos Border Briefs Market Watch Penney posts gain but warns of loss Money Wise: Find a bank that doesn’t charge for its own ATM use Market Briefs Technology Watch Executive Homes/Executive Employment Around the State Around the Nation

23 Around the World

Laredo Community College

Education Issues

Ramon H. Dovalina, Ph.D., President, rdovalina@laredo.cc.tx.us

721-5101,

sbarrientos@laredo.cc.tx.us Sandra Rodriguez, Welfare to Work Mentor, 764-5961

Priscilla

G. Medina, Welfare to Work Account

Juan L. Maldonado, Ph.D., Vice President for Instruction and Student Development, 721-5142, jlmaldon@laredo.cc.tx.us

Executive, 764-5960, pmedina@laredo.cc.tx.us

Business Instruction

Workforce Education

Alma Hernandez, Dean of Adult and Continuing Education, 721-5830, ahernandez@laredo.cc.tx.us

Francisco Martinez, Jr., Dean of Workforce Education, 721-5437, fmartinez@laredo.cc.tx.us

Edward Macdonald, Chair of Management Department, 721-5870, emac@laredo.cc.tx.us

Roxanne Vedia, Business and I n d u s t r y T r a i n i n g C o o r d i n a t o r , 7 2 1 - 5 8 9 1 , r v e d i a @ l a r e d o . c c . t x . u s

Rosaura D e v e l o p m e n t S p e c i a l i s t , r s m e d e l l i n @ l a r e Medellin, d o . c c . t x . u s

Workforce 721-5174,

Virginia Mayers, Director of Continuing Education Work to Succeed Programs Susan Barrientos, Welfare to Work Facilitator, 764-5959,

Javier Moctezuma, Chair of Office

O c c u p a t i o n s , 721-5187, j m o c t e z u m a @ l a r e d o . c c . t x . u s Community Development/Border Issues

Blas Castañeda, Chief Development Officer, bcastaneda@laredo.cc.tx.us

Business Operations - LCC

Dan Flores, Chief Financial Officer and Business Manager, 721-5124, d lores@laredo.cc.tx.us

LMTBusiness Journal

May 21, 2001

Texas A&M International University

College of Business Administration Staff Directory

Department of Accounting and Information Systems

lboyd@tamiu.edu

Dr. Willie N. Cargill, Professor/Chair, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, Distance Learning Coordinator, 326-2501, cargill@tamiu.edu

Dr. Jorge Omar R. Brusa, Assistant Professor of Finance, Department of Economics and Finance,

326-2511, jbrusa@tamiu.edu

Dr.

Van

Miller,

Associate

Professor

of

Mr. Jesus S. Carmona, Instructor of Information Systems, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, 326-2530, jcarmona@tamiu.edu

International Business Department of Economics

and Finance, 326-2512, vmiller@tamiu.edu

Dr. J. Michael Patrick, Professor

of

Dr. Oscar Flores, Assistant Professor of Information Systems, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, 326-2503, oflores@tamiu.edu

Economics, Department of Economics and Finance, Director, Texas Center for Border Economics and Enterprise Development, 326- 2547, jmpatrick@tamiu.edu

Dr. Soongoo Hong, Assistant Professor of Information Systems, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, 326-2532, shong@tamiu.edu

Dr. Michael J. Pisani, Instructor of Economics, Department of Economics and Finance, 326-2531, mpisani@tamiu.edu

Dr. George K. Kostopoulos, Professor of Information Systems Department of Accounting and

Information Systems, kostopoulos@tamiu.edu

326-2524,

Dr. Dev Prasad, Associate Professor of Finance, Department of Economics and Finance, 326-2515, dprasad@tamiu.edu

Dr. Stephen E. Lunce, Associate Professor of Information Systems, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, 326-2502, slunce@tamiu.edu

Dr. Stephanie A.M. Smith, Associate Professor of Finance, Department of Economics and Finance, 326-2518, samsmith@tamiu.edu

Dr. Gary Miller, Professor of Accounting, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, 326-2513, gmiller@tamiu.edu

Dr. David Yoskowitz, Assistant Professor of Economics, Department of Economics and Finance, 326-2509, yosko@tamiu.edu

Dr. William A. Newman, Radcliffe Killam Distinguished Professor of Information Systems, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, 326-2536, wnewman@tamiu.edu

Department of Management and Marketing

Dr. Jacqueline R. Mayfield, Associate Professor/Co-Chair, Department of Management and Marketing, 326-2533, jmayfield@tamiu.edu

Dr. Jacqueline L. Power, Assistant Professor of Accounting, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, 326-2505, power@tamiu.edu

Dr. Milton R. Mayfield, Associate Professor/Co- Chair, Department of Management and Marketing, 326-2534, mmayfield@tamiu.edu

Dr. Kannan Raghunandan, Radcliffe Killam Distinguished Professor of Accounting, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, 326 2504,

raghu@tamiu.edu

Dr. John P. Kohl, Dean, College of Business Administration and Graduate School of International Trade and Business Administration, 326-2480,

Dr. Dasaratha V. Rama, Professor of Information Systems, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, 326-2521, dvrama@tamiu.edu

jkohl@tamiu.edu Dr. Gregory

S.

Black,

Visiting

Assistant

Professor of Marketing, Department of Management and Marketing, 326-2580, gblack@tamiu.edu

Dr. Betty S. Rogers, Assistant Professor of Business Communication, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, 326-2527, brogers@tamiu.edu

Dr. Pedro S.

Logistics

and

Hurtado, Associate Professor

Management,

Department

of of

Management and hurtado@tamiu.edu

Marketing,

326-2522,

Dr. Rolando P. Sanchez, Assistant Professor, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, 326-2519, rsanchez@tamiu.edu

Dr. Michael Landeck, Professor of Marketing and International Business, Department of Management and Marketing, 326-2541, mlandeck@tamiu.edu

Dr. Henry C. Smith, III, Associate Professor of Accounting, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, 326-2507, hsmith@tamiu.edu

Dr. Ananda K. Mukherji, Assistant Professor of Management, Department of Management and Marketing, 326-2526, max@tamiu.edu

Dr. Edward Willman, Associate Professor of Quantitative Methods, Department of Accounting

Dr. Jyotsna Mukherji,

Assistant Professor of

and Information willman@tamiu.edu

Systems,

326-2508,

Marketing,

Department

of

Management

Marketing, 326-2542, jyo@tamiu.edu

and

Department of Economics and Finance

Dr.

Kamal

D.

Parhizgar,

Professor

of

Dr. Antonio J. Rodriguez, Associate Professor/Chair, Department of Economics and Finance & Assistant to the Dean, 326-2517, rodriguez@tamiu.edu

Management, Department of Management and Marketing, 326-2525, parhizgar@tamiu.edu

Dr. William L. Boyd, Professor of Finance, Department of Economics and Finance, Director of

International

Graduate

Studies,

326-2510,



William B. Green/Publisher 728-2501/bill@lmtonline.com

Frank J. Escobedo/Gen. Mgr. 728-2510/frankesc@lmtonline.com

Odie Arambula/Editor 728-2561/odie@lmtonline.com

Deirdre Reyna/Business Editor 728-2529/deirdre@lmtonline.com

Kelly Hildebrandt/Business Writer 728-2547/kelly@lmtonline.com

Estella Rodriguez/Managing Editor 728-2581/estel@lmtonline.com

Cuate Santos/Chief Photographer 728-2589/cuate@lmtonline.com

Adriana R. Devally/Retail Mgr. 728-2511/adriana@lmtonline.com

Socorro Garza/Adv. Billing Inquiries 728-2509/soco@lmtonline.com

Margie Aguirre/Classified Mgr. 728-2526/margieb@lmtonline.com

Agustin Magallanes/Circulation 728-2550

Michael Castillo/MIS Director 728-2505/mike@lmtonline.com







   

Exploring globalization’s cultural impact

BY GARY LOREN From Harvard Management Update c.2001 Harvard Business School Publishing

A photograph in Thomas Friedman’s book “The Lexus and the Olive Tree” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1999) crystallizes globalization’s potential for strengthening local culture by satisfying the deep- seated human need to feel rooted.

In the photograph, an Orthodox Jew is holding a cell phone up against the Western Wall in Jerusalem so that a relative on another continent can say a prayer at this holy site.

But globalization’s cultural impact is not always so positive. In traditional Muslim societies, for example, meals rarely take place outside the home. When women and men do share a common public space for meals — as in a restaurant — separate rooms

or curtained-off areas are usually provided. But when Pizza Hut entered Yemen, it created integrated dining rooms for its facilities, notes Dirk Vandewalle, a professor of government at Dartmouth College who specializes in the Middle East, North Africa and

The forces

of

internationalization

and

the Third World.

traditional culture clashed: Women could no longer be separated from men unrelated to them while they ate, or eat in public without removing their veils. Now younger Yemeni women casually whip off their veils when they sit down to eat at a Pizza Hut.

The problem here is globalization’s tendency to eradicate the local norms that traditional societies use to give individuals a common identity and purpose.

In the post-Cold War era, security concerns increasingly take on a cultural cast. “What is important psychologically

for people,” Vandewalle says, “is to know that their countries won’t change completely, that their values will endure.” European countries “are less concerned about economic security than they are about their cultural way of life. For example, they are terribly

worried issues.”

about

immigration

Given the mobility of labor today, Europeans fear the loss of their national identities in a wave of migration of people from unstable economies — say, those of sub-Saharan Africa.

One of the paradoxes of globalization is that although

its

characteristic

democratization

of

technology,

finance and

information

weakens

governments with centrally planned and controlled economies, succeeding in a globalized economy calls for the tight coordination of efforts between government and industry.

South Korea, for example, has targeted the steel industry, making adjustments to its work force and infrastructure that have enabled it to become a world leader in the manufacture of high-quality steel.

“But there are relatively high entry costs to joining the knowledge economies that represent globalization’s leading edge,” Vandewalle points out. Many countries lack the political cohesion, educated work force, and legal and financial sophistication required to emulate South Korea’s undertaking.

The developed world has little incentive to invest in such countries (beyond extracting their raw materials), as the

increasingly

skewed

international

investment

patterns attest. Currently, Vandewalle notes, “85 percent of all international investment

goes to only 1 countries.” Left unchecked

2

to 15

globali-

zation’s winner-take-all tendency threatens to create an underclass of nations locked out of the new world order. The downward spiral of these have-nots’ economies will be accompanied by social disintegration — when that occurs, the massive migration that haunts the developed countries will be right around the corner.

What does the good life mean in a shrinking world? The winners in the globalized economy may have little economic incentive to assist

developing economies.

nations’

But economic and cultural incentives are closely linked these days. Now more than ever, Vandewalle says, developed countries’ desire to preserve their cultural identity calls for “increased involvement in issues beyond their borders.”

(Gary Loren is the editor of the Harvard Management Update newsletter.)

Motorola to lay off 600 workers in Mexico

MEXICO

CITY

(AP)

Motorola workers weekend

will lay off 600 and eliminate shifts at its mobile

phone

plant

in

northern

Mexico,

officials

said

Wednesday.

The decision follows a drop in global demand for wireless handsets and is part of the

company’s

previously

announced plans to cut 7,000 jobs worldwide in its personal communications sector.

But lower than expected demand, partly due to the U.S. economic slowdown, have forced Motorola to adapt “its overall cost structure, work force and production levels to a more competitive business model,” the company said in a news release.

Motorola said the Chihuahua plant’s remaining 1,900 people will be able to meet current demand working Monday to Friday.

Motorola said the Saturday and Sunday shifts were introduced at its plant in Chihuahua nearly a year ago when demand forecasts for mobile phones were much higher.

LMTBusiness Journal

May 21, 2001

Document info
Document views2
Page views2
Page last viewedWed Oct 26 04:26:40 UTC 2016
Pages1
Paragraphs225
Words1838

Comments