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App. B—Commissioned Background Papers

  • ‚óŹ

    127

Mitchell Hutchins Inc.

AN ANALYSIS OF ROBOT MANUFACTURING

.

Multisector Industry To Evolve in the 1980s

In 1980, sales of robots by U.S.

based

companies

approached

$100

million,

up

sharply from the

estimated $60-65 million sionary environment, the

in sales in 1979. robot industry size

While a growth of 50% is impressive during a was still less than 2% of the $4.69 billion

reces- machine

tool industry with which it often was mistakenly included and an insignificant part

(4/1000 of

1%) of U.S. GNP.

While robots are commonly assumed to be an extension of the machine tool in-

dustry because of its strong ties with manufacturing, we believe into its own subset of the flexible automation equipment sector

that with

the industry will evolve a multitude of segments

much akin to the early development of the minicomputer industry in the 1960s However, in contrast to the minicomputer industry, it is conceivable for the

and early 1970s. major participants

in robotics to significantly change character a significant portion of robot manufacturers

by to

the next decade.

We

become

part

of

major

believe it is likely for companies organized to ,

supply systems and subsystems for the factory of the future.

A pure robot

company

might

only

service

a

small,

specialized

segment

of

the

factory

automation

market.

It is our opinion that the structure of the robotic sector to the early stage development of the minicomputer industry.

will evolve in a manner Through the mid-1960s,

similar the mini-

computer industry half of the 1960s

was and

dominated by two major computer manufacturers. Beginning in the second into the 1970s, this sector developed a more elaborate structure.

Table 10:

Structure of the Minicomputer Industry in 1970

Buys

Makes

Sells to

Peripheral Equipment Manufacturers

Minicomputers

Peripherals

Software

(includes terminals

Peripherals Software

Mainframes Peripherals

Software systems

and secondary

memories) Minicomputers

End-user

OEM's Independent

systems houses

Minicomputers

Peripherals

Peripherals

Software

Software

Systems

Engineering

Minicomputers

Programming

End-user

Software

OEM End-user

Minicomputers

Systems

Peripherals

Software

The interfaces depicted by this

structure can essentially be split into four subsegments:

1.

The end users who could. .

2.

purchase

a

system

from

the

original

equipment

supplier

directly,

or.

.

,

  • 3.

    sometimes go to a group Of independent consultants who help the purchaser put together systems and subsystems, or. . .

  • 4.

    sometimes turn to a company that has developed a turnkey product using OEM supplier equipment as the heart of the system.

9

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