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serves as guardian

a type god of

of votive offering a child; each year

to

the

the

fa-

ther adds a section to is left in sacred places.

furiction today, tourist trade. lf3

but

is

the object, which It still serves thk also made for the

Even the borders vey a feeling of the

of the portraits

con-

Huichol

culture.

“I

wanted that run

to put down some of the

through

their

artwork,”

scenes Lucas

ing their culture,”

Lucas explains.

Although of Huichol

yam paintings

and

children

preserve

portraits a bit of

Huichol

culture,

only a dedicated

effort

on the part of nment and the help prolong,

both the Mexican

gover-

Huichols

themselves

if

not

preserve,

this

can van-

ishing

way of life. It

is encouraging

that,

while

many Huichols

are moving

out of

their traditional

communities,

others are

wasn’t

able to

get it all

into

their cos-

tumes

because

I couldn’t

get

the detail.

said,

“such as, for instance,

plant and the animals and

the

the peyote

deer. But I

So that

was the

borders;

I picked

artwork

and put

see these

themes

beginning of the large up the themes of their

them into the borders. in their embroidery,

I in

ingeniously

combining

offered by

government

the advantages

educational

and

assistance

programs

with various

of their

traditional

culture. 19

stance,

the

traditional

Huichol

aspects For in- social

grant from

the Spanish

crown),

has

emerged as

a successful

foundation

for

unit,

the comunidad (a

chartered

land

their

beadwork,

ings

and votive

and in their bowls. ” 15

yam

paint-

Lucas believes

that artists are “trans-

the business of cattle-raising-an enter- are begin- suggests an- prise ning in which the to specialize. Huichols Perhaps,

a society feel

about

themselves

and

the

world around

them.

15 She says

that

the

mitters”

or “historians”

of the fabric

of a

society,

expressing

how

the members

of

somber,

almost

mournful

expressions

on

feel over

the decline

the face

of modern

children

intuitively

the faces of

the children

choles” are

a reflection

the

elder

Huichols

of

their

culture in

civilization.

in

“Niffos hui-

of

the anguish

15

“The

feel

that

they’re

losing

their

identity,

los-

thropologist

Phil C. Weigand,

SUNY,

Stony Brook,

the Huichols

are undergo-

ing

a period of

dynamic

change—a

peri-

od

from which,

it may

be hoped,

their

culture will emerge and stability. 19

with a new vitality

*****

My thanks to Stephen A. Bonaduce and Tern”Freedman for their help in the

prepamtion of this essay.

Q19E61s1

REFERENCES

1. Gdidd

E. The psychedelic

ml of the Huichol

Indians.

Essays

of

on

information

scientisl.

2.

Phdadelphia: . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . Huichol

1S1 Press,

1981. Vol. 4.

mythology

and culture.

p. 348-50. Parts 1&2.

Ibid

1983. Vol.

5. p. 164-77.

3.

4. 5.

1984. Vol.

6. p. 38-46.

O.

Personal

communications.

  • ---------------

    Child care: an investment

Ibid Vaquez

Myerfioff B G.

Peyote

and

the

mysti

c

in the future.

Part

2.

The

1S1

Caring

Center

for

Children

20

March

1985, and 3

April 1986.

cd.

) A rf of

the Huicho/

Jndians

7 February

1981,

vision.

(Ben-in

K,

and Parents.

6. 7,

New York: Abrams, Rim Martinez E. Penonal FurBt P T & Myerhoff B

    • 1978.

      p. 56-70. communication.

  • G.

    Myth as history:

15 March 1985. the jimsonweed

cycle of the Huichols

of Mexico.

8.

,4 ntropol{gica Berrin K, ed. Art

t 7:3-39,

19b6,

OJ-the

Huichof

Indians.

J4ew York:

Abrams,

9, Ouroboros,

Encycfopae2ia

Britannica.

Chicasm

Encyclopedia

10.

Mnller

K.

Huichol

art

and

acculturation.

(Berrin

K,

cd.)

A r;

of

1978.212 Britannica,

p.

the

Huichol

1985. Vol. 9. p. 13. Indians

11.

New Lumhohz

York:

Abrams,

C.

Memoirs

of

1978. p. 84-ICO.

the

American

Museum

of

Natural

History.

Vol. 1. Symbolism

of the Huichol

Ind{aps.

i2.

Furst

New York: P T. The

American Museum of art of “being HuichoL”

Natural [Berrin

History,

1900,

K,

ed.

I Art

of

227 the

p. Huichol

Indians.

13.

New Lumhohz

York:

Abram%

1978.

C.

IJnknown

Mexico.

p. 18-34. New York:

Scribners,

1902.2

vols.

14.

---------------

Memoirs

of the A metican

Museum

of Notuml

History.

Vol. .?. Decom:ivc

art of the Huichol

Indians

New York:

15. 16.

Lucas Zbtgg

L.

Personal

R

M. The

17. D*s P. Initiation New York:

American

Museum

communication. Huichols; primitive

of

Natural

12

February

History, 1986.

artists.

New

York:

by a Huichol

shaman.

(Berrin

K,

cd.

)

Abrams.

1978.

p.

129-41.

1904.46

Stecherl,

Art

of

the

p.

1938.826

Huichoi

p. Indians

18. 19.

Fumt P T. Personal

communication.

We@nd

P C.

Contempmary

social

25 and

March 1986. economic structure.

(Berrin K, ed 1 Art of (he H“ich.1

Indians

New York:

Abrams,

1978. p. 1OI-I5.

181

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