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PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

Building a Better Community with You

Volume 9 Issue 4

Building Services - Planning - Development Engineering Services

April 2008

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Calendar of Meetings Commercial Projects Apt./Hotel Projects Subdivision Projects Permit Totals Residential Permit Details Commercial Permit Details Inspection Totals Rezoning Scoop Bldg. Permit Comparison Comp. Plan Update Click2Gov Performance Measures

Points of Interest:

Page 1 Inspector’s Corner

Page 11

Comprehensive Plan Update

Page 12 Click2Gov

2 3 4 4 5 6 8 9 9 10 11 12 12

PERMITS BY TYPE

Single-Family Home

247

247

$37,116,858

Duplex

30

60

$4,697,748

Tri-Plex/Four-plex

2

6

$515,350

Apartment

17

148

$9,505,173

New Commercial

32

N/A

$87,119,960

Commercial Remodel

27

N/A

$2,841,065

YEAR TO

DATE

Type of Permit

Permit Unit

Ninfa’s Mexican Restaurant, 1007 Earl Rudder Fwy

Inspector’s Corner Conditioned Attic Assemblies

Amount

The design philosophy in regards to the attic space on new home construction has started to change due to the increasing energy-efficient demands. It has become a common practice in recent years for HVAC units to be placed in the attic areas of residential buildings. The ventilation requirements of attics in the 2003 Code do not allow for conditioned attic spaces. This has been a major source of energy inefficiency because attic installed HVAC units and their ducts, a master source of air leakage, are within an environment extremely hot in summer and cold in the winter. Additionally, attic ventilation and introduction of exterior air within the building enve- lope in highly humid regions appear to be an unsound practice that has potential implications for the integrity of building elements. In recent years, many advocates of building sciences and energy efficiency have researched and experimented in construction of new homes with the concept of conditioned attic spaces. It appears the re- sults of all such research and experimentation have been positive and reflect the correctness of the theories for conditioned attic spaces. As such, the 2006 Code has incorporated new prescriptive provisions for conditioned attic assemblies which employ different requirements based on the climatic region where the building is located. For the College Station/Bryan region a 1-perm or less vapor retarder is placed to the exterior of the structural roof deck: that is, just above the roof structural sheathing, and make up air must be provided in order for the HVAC system to perform efficiently. If you decide to design and build your house using this method you will need to submit load calculations to the City of College Station Building Department prior to issuance of the building permit. If you have any questions contact the City of College Station at 764-3570.

Chris Haver, CBO Building Official

Tracking the Numbers

Single-Family Homes: (Does not include slab onlys)

YTD – 1 yr

YTD – 2 yr

2%

18%

Commercial: (Does not include slab onlys)

YTD – 1 yr

YTD – 2 yr

23%

6%

Total Permits:

YTD - 1 yr

YTD - 2 yr

2%

4%

Year-to-date, single-family home permits increased in quantity when compared to last year at this time, April 2007, and decreased when compared with two years ago, April 2006.

Year-to-date, commercial permits experi- enced a decrease in quantity when compared to last year at this time, April 2007, and a decrease compared with two years ago, April 2006.

Year-to-date, total permits experienced an increase in quantity when compared to last year at this time, April 2007, and ex- perienced an decrease when compared with two years ago, April 2006.

1101 Texas Avenue

www.cstx.gov

979.764.3570

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