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ROBERT W. BROCKWAYTHE ROOTS OF NEW AGE

indeed, Wicca itself is largely based on her theories and evidence.

As we shall see throughout this study, therefore, there is constant interaction between scholars and esotericists, with many of the former first adhering to what are later rejected as esoteric beliefs. Many archaeological theories, such as diffusionism, are perpetuated by esotericists, and the scholars and scientists who originaly proposed them are cited as authority figures. This also applies in the area of esoteric experience. As mentioned previously, Analytical Psychology, the school founded by C. G. Jung, is itself deeply affected by the esoteric, and has had much continuing impact on New Age. One of Jung’s chief detractors, Richard Noll, has recently levied devastating blows against Analytical Psychology in The Jung Cult (1994) and The Aryan Christ (1997). My Young Carl Jung (1997) takes issue with Noll in certain respects, especially Noll’s assertion that Jung was a charlatan. However, his arguments are well documented and not easily answered. There is no question but that Jung was deeply immersed in esotericism and the occult, as he openly acknowledged, and that he regarded his theory of archetypes of the collective unconscious as a modern restatement of late classical mystical philosophies such as Gnosticism and Neo Platonism. I do not think that he deliberately set out to found a religion, however. To the contrary, he frequently said, “I am the only Jungian.” And regarded himself as a scientist. More will be said about Jung in later chapters. We turn now to the question of paganism and the claims of New Agers that it persisted into modern times to be revived by Wiccans and other Neo-Pagans.

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