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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - page 8 / 24

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8 / 24

1204

MMWR

November , 2008

Hispanic

152

948,378

3.3

(2.8–4.0)

3.6

(3.0–4.3)

White, non-Hispanic

609

6,463,265

4.2

(3.8–4.7)

4.1

(3.6–4.6)

Black, non-Hispanic

179

1,008,987

3.9

(3.3–4.7)

3.7

(3.0–4.4)

Asian, non-Hispanic

35

272,982

2.8

(1.8–4.2)

3.7

(2.2–5.2)

Men

351

3,409,372

3.2

(2.8–3.7)

3.2

(2.7–3.6)

Women

633

5,423,937

4.8

(4.3–5.3)

4.8

(4.3–5.3)

Normal

225

1,888,507

2.3

(1.9–2.8)

2.3

(1.9–2.7)

Overweight

325

2,858,764

3.9

(3.4–4.5)

4.0

(3.5–4.6)

Obese

434

4,086,038

6.3

(5.6–7.1)

6.2

(5.4–6.9)

* Dened as having impaired fasting glucose (plasma glucose level of 100 to <126 mg/dL after an overnight fast), impaired glucose tolerance (plasma glucose level of 140 to <200 mg/dL after a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test), or both. Condence interval. Calculated from a logistic regression model that included sex, age group, race/ethnicity, and body mass index (BMI) category. Normal weight, overweight, and obese are dened as BMI of <25 kg/m2, 25 to <30 kg/m2, or >30 kg/m2, respectively, using height and weight reported by participant. §

Weight status

322

3,017,364

2.7

(2.4–3.2)

2.9

(2.4–3.3)

385

3,684,869

5.0

(4.4–5.7)

4.7

(4.1–5.3)

277

2,131,076

6.0

(5.2–6.9)

5.9

(5.0–6.7)

Sex

Age group (yrs)

18–44 45–64

>65

Race/Ethnicity

TABLE. Number and percentage of adults aged >18 years with self-reported prediabetes,* by selected characteristics — National

Health Interview Survey, United States, 2006

Characteristic Total

prediabetes

of U.S. adults

%

(95% CI)

Adjusted %§

(95% CI)

984

8,833,309

4.0

(3.7–4.4)

No. reporting

Estimated no.

activities during the preceding 12 months, 23.9% (CI = 20.3%–27.4%) had not engaged in any of these risk-reduction activities (Figure).

Reported by: DR Rolka, MS, NR Burrows, MPH, Y Li, MPH, LS Geiss, MA, Div of Diabetes ranslation, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.

Editorial Note: is report provides the first nationally repre- sentative estimates of the prevalence of self-reported prediabetes in the U.S. adult population and the first estimates of the prevalence of risk-reduction activities among adults who had been told they had prediabetes. e results indicate that, in 2006, only 4% of U.S. adults were aware they had prediabetes or a condition indicative of prediabetes. In addition, 24% of U.S. adults with prediabetes did not participate in any of three recommended risk-reduction activities

  • e finding of 4% self-reported prevalence of prediabetes is low

compared with the 26% of U.S. adults aged >20 years estimated to have impaired fasting glucose based on laboratory test results in the 2003–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) (1). Other NHANES data, from 1988–1994, indicate an even higher prevalence of prediabetes among persons aged 40–74 years. During that period, NHANES conducted oral glucose tolerance tests of persons in that age group and estimated that 40% of adults aged 40–74 years had impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or both (2).

  • e low prevalence of self-reported prediabetes described

in this report likely indicates a low level of awareness among

FIGURE. Percentage of adults aged >18 years with self-reported prediabetes* who participated in selected activities that reduce risk for diabetes — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2006

Tried to lose or control weight

Increased physical activity or exercise

Selected activities

Reduced fat or calories

None of the activities

One activity

Two activities

Three activities

0

20

40 Percentage

60

80

  • *

    Dened as having impaired fasting glucose (plasma glucose level of 100 to <126 mg/dL after an overnight fast), impaired glucose tolerance (plasma glucose level of 140 to <200 mg/dL after a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test), or both.

    • 95% condence interval.

persons who have prediabetes. Prediabetes is a relatively new term that came into wider use beginning in 2002, after publica- tion of results from the Diabetes Prevention Program interven- tion trial (5). Physicians and other health-care providers have

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