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Box 5.2

Timeline of NAFTA tariff phaseouts

January 1994

Elimination of Mexican tariffs on US sorghum, certain citrus fruit, fresh strawberries, and seasonal tariffs on oranges

Elimination of US tariffs on Mexican corn, sorghum, barley, soy- meal, apples, pears, peaches, fresh strawberries, beef, pork, and poultry, and of seasonal tariffs on oranges

January 1998

Elimination of leftover CUSFTA tariffs Completion of US-Mexico four-year transition period Elimination of Mexican tariffs on US pears, plums, and apricots

Elimination of US tariffs on Mexican nondurum wheat, soy oil, and cotton, and of seasonal tariffs on oranges

January 2002

Elimination of Canadian agricultural tariffs on Mexican fish, meat, sugar, flour, dairy, and beer1

January 2003

Completion of US-Mexico nine-year transition period

Elimination of Mexican tariffs on US wheat, barley, rice, dairy, soy- bean meal and soy oil, poultry, peaches, apples, frozen straw- berries, hogs, pork, cotton, and tobacco, and of seasonal tariffs on oranges

Elimination of US tariffs on Mexican durum wheat, rice, limes, win- ter vegetables, dairy products, and frozen strawberries

October 2007

Elimination of US-Mexico sugar tariffs

January 2008

Completion of US-Mexico 14-year transition period

Elimination of US tariffs on Mexican frozen concentrated orange juice, winter vegetables, and peanuts

Elimination of Mexican tariffs on corn and dry beans

1. Specifically refers to the following agricultural commodities by 2-digit Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) code: fish and crustaceans (HTS 3); edible preparations of meat, fish, crustaceans, molluscs, or other aquatic invertebrates (HTS 16); sugars and sugar confectionery (HTS 17); and preparations of cereals, flour, starch or milk, and bakers’ wares (HTS 19).

Note: Under NAFTA, traditional Mexican licensing requirements were converted to tariffs or tariff rate quotas (TRQs). As an example, in January 2003, Mexican quotas that were converted to tariffs covered wheat, tobacco, cheese, milk, and grapes (seasonal basis).

Source: US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.

workforce. In figure 5.1, a cross-country regression covering about 76 countries illustrates how a 1 percent increase in income per capita is as- sociated with a reduction in agriculture value added as a share of GDP by about 0.6 percentage points. Time-series analysis tells the same story. Just as the agricultural sector in advanced economies accounted for a declin- ing share of GDP in the first half of the 20th century as income per capita increased, the agricultural share of GDP in South Korea declined from

AGRICULTURE

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