X hits on this document

112 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

21 / 32

Students spend approximately 25 percent of their MSW graduate education participating in a field placement. ey have reported that some of their most memorable and rewarding experiences have been generated from their field-based experiences. Many of our students come to the School of Social Work from numerous places around the country and the world, and they are eager to learn how to make a difference. e Office of Field Instruction is enthusiastic

Ben Hayes

PUBLIC HEALTH ACCRA, GHANA

“I feel extremely fortunate to have spent the summer in Ghana learning from community- based HIV/AIDS organizations (CBOs). I worked with e AIDS Support Association (TASA), an association of people living with HIV/AIDS in the port city of Tema, and the Center for Popular Education and Human Rights (CEPEHRG), an LGBT group in Accra. Exploring the challenges of community-based organizing in international income-poor settings, I learned two primary lessons: 1) Ghana CBOs could greatly benefit from long-term technical and administrative partnerships and 2) outsiders must critically analyze the impact of their posi- tioning in the local social, economic, cultural, and political contexts.”

Note: Ben Hayes, MSW/MPH student, did his field placement in Ghana through the University of Michigan/University of Ghana Social Work Profes- sional Practicum Exchange Program, established in 1995 by Professor Edith Lewis and Professor Nana Apt, then department head at the University of Ghana. Ben’s trip was made possible by funding from the School of Social Work, the International Institute, and the Center for African and African- American Studies.

Ben tries the Ghanaian dish fufu.

about working in tandem with students to develop and approve a variety of field experiences that match their interests and needs. e following students have taken a leadership role in identifying field- based opportunities.

  • Betsy Voshel, LMSW, ACSW, is director of Field Instruction and

assistant clinical professor of social work.

Shenaaz Janmohamed

COMMUNITY ORGANIzATION: COMMUNITIES AND SOCIAL SYSTEMS GARTHAMA, PAKISTAN-ADMINISTERED KASHMIR

“e South Asia earthquake of 2005 devastated much of Northern Pakistan and parts of Kashmir and India, killing over 73,000 souls and displac- ing millions of smiles. e School of Social Work granted me the opportunity to visit Pakistan and provide disaster relief. During this time, I witnessed endless suffering yet an admirable and necessary resilience within the people. I wanted to capture this strength and saw gaps in participatory-inspired programs as a vehicle to empower communities. e photovoice meth- odology provided a platform for child survivors to share their knowledge and courage to inspire others. e project asked for children’s input on infrastructural damage and the effects the earth- quake had on their lives.”

Note: Though not a field placement, Shenaaz’s summer experience was funded by a U-M Inter- national Institute Individual Fellowship and was hosted by the Aga Khan Development Network.

Aasil K. Ahmad

Shenaaz greets two earthquake survivors.

Ongoing Winter/Spring 2007

·

1

Document info
Document views112
Page views112
Page last viewedFri Dec 09 08:35:15 UTC 2016
Pages32
Paragraphs876
Words17726

Comments