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Changing Entertainment. Again. - page 59 / 68

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Additional Information

VCR IN

DVD/VCR COMPONENT

AUDIO

LINE1

OUT

IDEOOUT

OUT

R

R

Pr

R

DIGITAL AUDIO OUT

L

L

Pb

L

VIDEO

Y

COAXIAL

OPTICAL

Back of the DVD/VCR

When connecting, make sure you connect Output jacks to Input jacks, Video to Video, Right Audio to Right Audio, etc. A description of each jack follows.

ANT. IN

RF OUT

S-VIDEO OUT

Description of Jacks (from left to right)

S-VIDEO OUT – If your TV has an S-VIDEO jack, connect an S-Video cable to the DVD/VCR’s S- VIDEO jack and to the TV’s S-Video jack to achieve better picture quality than using the VIDEO jack. S-Video only carries the picture, so you must connect the audio cables, as well. This connection is only for DVD signal. For the VCR signal, you must also connect the standard video cable.

VCR IN (AUDIO/VIDEO) – If you are using color-coded red, yellow and white RCA cables, connect these jacks to a video input component, such as a video game system or camcorder.

DVD/VCR OUT (AUDIO/VIDEO) – If you are using color-coded red, yellow and white RCA cables, connect these jacks to the corresponding jacks on your TV.

COMPONENT VIDEO OUT (Y, Pb, Pr) – Use these jacks to connect to a TV with component video input jacks. Unlike a single video input, component video maintains the video signal as three separate signals through these three jacks. This connection provides optimum quality. To ensure maximum picture quality, use three video-grade cables for the Y, Pb, and Pr connections. It is essential to match the color-coded connectors with a compatible TV. This connection is only for DVD signal. For the VCR signal, you must also connect the standard video cable.

AUDIO OUT— Use these jacks to connect your DVD/VCR to an audio/video receiver. DIGITAL AUDIO OUT (OPTICAL and COAXIAL)

Use one of these jacks to connect your DVD/VCR to a receiver or decoder with Dolby Digital or DTS capability. Some receivers have either the COAXIAL or OPTICAL type of Digital Audio Input jack, and some have both. Under most conditions, optical and coaxial connections work equally well — the only difference is the type of cable you connect to the jack.

If you want to use a less expensive cable, connect a coaxial cable to the COAXIAL jack if your receiver has a COAXIAL input jack. Rarely, but sometimes, coaxial digital cables — especially long ones, pick up radio frequency (RF) interference from household appliances, nearby power lines, and/ or broadcast towers.

Chapter 6

55

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