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Vehicle Ownership

$0.00

$0.21

$0.21

$0.16

$0.21

$0.01

Vehicle Operating

$0.02

$0.14

($0.00)

$0.13

$0.11

$0.15

Operating Subsidies

$0.00

$0.00

($0.13)

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

Travel Time

$0.06

$0.05

($0.05)

($0.12)

($0.77)

$0.23

Internal Accident

$0.00

$0.00

$0.05

$0.00

$0.00

$0.05

External Accident

$0.00

$0.04

$0.03

$0.03

$0.03

$0.04

Internal Parking

$0.00

$0.05

$0.05

$0.05

$0.05

$0.05

External Parking

$0.00

$0.12

$0.12

$0.11

$0.12

$0.12

Congestion

$0.15

$0.17

$0.16

$0.16

$0.17

$0.17

Roadway Facilities

$0.00

$0.02

$0.01

$0.02

$0.02

$0.02

Roadway Land Value

$0.00

$0.02

$0.02

$0.02

$0.02

$0.02

Municipal Services

$0.00

$0.02

$0.01

$0.01

$0.01

$0.01

Equity & Option Value

$0.00

$0.01

$0.01

$0.01

$0.01

$0.01

Air Pollution

$0.01

$0.06

$0.06

$0.06

$0.06

$0.06

Noise

$0.00

$0.01

$0.01

$0.01

$0.01

$0.01

Resource Consumption

$0.00

$0.03

$0.02

$0.03

$0.03

$0.03

Barrier Effect

$0.01

$0.02

$0.01

$0.01

$0.02

$0.02

Land Use Impacts

$0.00

$0.07

$0.07

$0.07

$0.07

$0.00

Water Pollution

$0.00

$0.01

$0.01

$0.01

$0.01

$0.01

Waste Disposal

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

Totals

$0.25

$1.03

$0.66

$0.77

$0.18

$0.99

Guide to Calculating Mobility Management Benefits Victoria Transport Policy Institute

Monetizing Benefits It is often helpful to monetize (measure in monetary units) nonmarket impacts so they can be incorporated into standard economic evaluation and compared with market impacts. Economists have long monetized impacts such as travel time and accident damages for evaluating transportation projects, and in recent years have developed techniques for monetizing many social and environmental impacts (Delucchi 1998; Litman 2009).

Mobility management economic analysis often deals with cost differences (the difference in cost between different types of travel, such as driving and public transit travel) per unit of travel. For example, the net benefit of a transit service improvement depends on the number of automobile trips reduced per transit vehicle trip. Table 19 illustrates monetized estimates of net benefits for six mobility management strategies under urban- peak conditions. It indicates that a trip shifted from urban peak to urban off-peak provides benefits averaging about 25¢ per mile, a shift from driving to bus transit provides benefits of 66¢ per mile, and shifting to cycling provides benefits averaging 77¢ per mile.

This table shows estimated monetized benefits under urban peak conditions.

These represent generic cost values. Such values should be adjusted to reflect specific conditions and perspectives. For example, if parking costs are particularly high at a particular worksite the benefits of reduced automobile travel would also be higher.

Impact Category

Shift

Rideshare Transit

Bicycle

Walk

commute

Table 19

Monetized Benefits - 1996 U.S. Cents per Mile (Litman 2009)

Off-Peak

Bus

Tele-

25

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