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Guide to Calculating Mobility Management Benefits Victoria Transport Policy Institute

Examples The four examples described below demonstrate how mobility management program benefits can be evaluated using different perspectives and methods.

1.

Community Benefit Perspective

Consider the evaluation of a program that shifts 50 typical commuters from driving to public transit. Start by surveying participants to determine the average number of days shifted, which may be a high as 200 commute days a year. If the average round-trip commute is 24 miles, the program might shift 240,000 (50 employees x 200 days x 24

miles) total peak period miles per year from driving to transit. Table 21 shows estimated benefits from reductions in ten costs. This indicates average daily savings to society of

$11.16 per commute day (46.5¢ x 24 miles), and total savings of $111,600 per year.

Accidents

3.5¢

0.8¢

2.7¢

Parking

12¢

0

12¢

Congestion

17¢

1.4¢

15.6¢

Roadway Facilities

1.6¢

0.3¢

1.3¢

Roadway Land

2.4¢

0.1¢

2.3¢

Municipal Services

1.5¢

0.1¢

1.4¢

Air Pollution

8.2¢

1.5¢

6.7¢

Noise

1.0¢

0.2¢

0.8¢

Resource Consumption

2.9¢

0.4¢

2.5¢

Water Pollution

1.3¢

0.1¢

1.2¢

Table 21

Benefits of SOV to Transit Mode Shift (Cents Passenger Mile)

Cost

SOV Cost

Transit Cost

Savings

Total Savings per Passenger Mile This example calculates savings for a shift from driving to bus transit.

46.5¢

A survey indicates that 25% of participants drive alone to transit stops (park-and-ride), 25% are driven (kiss-and-ride), 25% bicycle, and 25% walk. Table 22 summarizes the external costs of these access trips, assuming that a typical park-and-ride trip imposes external costs averaging $2.50, kiss-and-ride trips cost society an average of $1.25, and bicycling and walking each cost society an average of $0.50 per trip. Access trip costs should be subtracted from calculated savings, for a total community benefit of almost $88,000 ($111,600 - $23,625 = $87,975). If the program increases travel choices or service quality for existing transit users, these represent additional benefits.

Park-and-Ride

$2.50

5,000

$12,500

Kiss-and-Ride

$1.25

5,000

$6,125

Bicycle

$0.50

5,000

$2,500

Walk

$0.50

5,000

$2,500

Total of All Access Trips

$23,625

Table 22

Community Costs for Transit Access Trips

Access Mode

Cost Per Trip

Trips Per Year

Total Access Trip Costs

30

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