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SME e-readiness in Malaysia: Implications for Planning and Implementation - page 24 / 44

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DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION

Discussion of Study Findings

Based on the overall e-readiness, the responding firms generally are not very sure about their

readiness in adopting e-commerce, e-business and Internet. An overall e-readiness mean of

3.44 explains this situation. Zooming into the components of e-readiness, from Table 7 the

mean of 3.29 and 3.28 suggests that in general SMEs in Northern Malaysia have mixed

feelings about their readiness in digital technology and e-commerce respectively. Nonetheless,

from the mean of 3.75 indicates that SMEs in Northern Malaysia have higher readiness in

terms of e-business readiness.

The regression analysis results show that infrastructure and technology, and top management

commitment variables have significant impact on SMEs’ e-readiness. Human capital,

information security, and resistance to change do not demonstrate any significant effect on

the e-readiness of SMEs.

Digital Technology Readiness

Management support has been found to positively and directly influence digital technology

readiness of SMEs. This is consistent with the research of Yap, Soh and Raman (1992),

Cragg and King (1993), and Igbaria et al. (1997) who found that the involvement of

management was positively associated with the success of IS implementation and computer

technology acceptance. Management support has been defined as the perceived level of

general support offered by top management in SMEs (Igbaria et al. 1997). The more

involvement and support demonstrated by top management, the higher the digital technology

readiness.

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