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treasures.  And, with all deference to Mr. Blades, glass-doors do

seem to be useful in excluding dust.

{3}  "Send him back carefully, for you can if you like, that all

unharmed he may return to his own place."

{4}  No wonder the books are scarce, if they are being hacked to

pieces by Grangerites.

{5}  These lines appeared in "Notes and Queries," Jan. 8, 1881.

{6}  In the Golden Ass of Apuleius, which Polia should not have

read.

{7}  M. Arsene Houssaye seems to think he has found them; marked on

the fly-leaves with an impression, in wax, of a seal engraved with

the head of Epicurus.

{8}  This chapter was written by Austin Dobson.--DP

{9}  The recent Winter Exhibition of the Old Masters (1881)

contained a fine display of Flaxman's drawings, a large number of

which belonged to Mr. F. T. Palgrave.

{10}  By Mr. Cosmo Monkhouse.

{11}  These words were written before the "Art Journal" had

published its programme for 1881.  From this it appears that the

present editor fully recognises the necessity for calling in the

assistance of the needle.

{12}  The example, here copied on the wood by M. Lacour, is a very

successful reproduction of Clennell's style.

{13}  He also illustrated the "Memoirs of Joseph Grimaldi."  But

this was simply "edited" by "Boz."

{14}  The reader will observe that this volume is indebted to Mr.

Crane for its beautiful frontispiece.

{15}  Since this paragraph was first written an interesting paper on

the illustrations in "Scribner," from the pen of Mr. J. Comyns Carr,

has appeared in "L'Art."

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