X hits on this document

PDF document

REGISTERED NURSES’ ATTITUDES TOWARD THE PROTECTION OF GAYS AND - page 33 / 161

370 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

33 / 161

share more similar characteristics with heterosexual women than

men. Thus, women would feel more comfortable around homosexual

males than men would. Similarly, the gender belief system theory

which supports similarities between gay men and heterosexual

women and between lesbians and heterosexual men also is used to

explain the difference in homophobia and homonegativity of the

genders (LaMar & Kite, 1998).

Race/Ethnicity

An understudied independent variable (Herek, 2000b),

race/ethnicity has also been supported as a predictor toward

homophobia (Finlay & Walther, 2003; Lewis, 2003; Battle &

Lemelle, 2002; Ellis, et. al, 2002; Herek, 2002a, 2002b; Lim,

2002; Hoffmann & Bakken, 2001; Olivero & Murataya, 2001; Plugge-

Foust & Strickland, 2001; Herek, 2000a, 2000b; Herek &

Capitanio, 1999; LaMar & Kite, 1998; Herek & Capitanio, 1995;

Herek, 1988; Douglas, Kalman, & Kalman, 1985). The finding of

more homophobia among African Americans and “other” ethnicities

is predominant in the literature (Herek, 2002a). Although

differences are found among attitudes towards gays and lesbians

and overall homophobia of different ethnicities and races,

research results can be conflicting. African Americans are much

more likely to condemn homosexual relations as “always wrong”

and are more likely to believe that AIDS is a punishment sent

23

Document info
Document views370
Page views370
Page last viewedSun Dec 04 04:38:04 UTC 2016
Pages161
Paragraphs2400
Words29225

Comments