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a lease because the tenant has been a victim of crime, including the crime of domestic violence.

If you or an occupant of the property are the victim of family violence (meaning, for example, harmful acts – including abuse, sexual assault, and threats – by a member of the family or household against someone else in the family or household), you may terminate your lease and leave the property without further obligation for future rent or termination fees. To exercise this right, you must have a protective order or temporary injunction, signed by a judge, against the occupant or co-tenant of your residence. Once you have delivered a copy of the protective order or temporary injunction to your landlord and you have vacated the unit, you have, by law, terminated your lease and avoided liability for future rent and other sums due under the lease for termination of the lease. If your lease does not contain language informing you of your rights to terminate the lease in situations involving family violence or military deployment/transfer, you will be released from liability for past unpaid rent. If the lease does contain such language, you will still be responsible for rent owed to the landlord before you terminated the lease. If a landlord does not let you terminate the lease under these conditions, she may be liable to you for one month’s rent, plus $500 and attorneys’ fees.

If you are a servicemember or a dependent of a servicemember, you may terminate your lease and leave the property without further obligation for future rent or termination fees if the lease was executed by the ser- vicemember before entering military service, or if the servicemember executes the lease while in military service and then is ordered to a permanent change of station or to deploy for more than 90 days. To terminate the lease, you must give the landlord written notice of termination of the lease and a copy of government documents showing that either the tenant entered military service or was ordered to change station or deploy. If your lease does not contain language informing you of your rights to terminate the lease in situations involving family violence or military deployment/transfer, you will be released from liability for past unpaid rent. If the lease does contain such language, you will still be responsible for rent owed to the landlord before you terminated the lease. If a landlord does not let you terminate the lease under these conditions, she may be liable to you for one month’s rent, plus $500 and attorneys’ fees.

A landlord that has an on-site management or superintendent's office must provide to you a telephone number that will be answered 24 hours a day for the purpose of reporting emergencies related to a condition of the property that materially affects your physical health or safety. The landlord must post the phone number prominently outside the management or superintendent’s office.

FINDING OUT WHO OWNS AND MANAGES THE PREMISES

As a tenant, you have the right to know the name and address of the owner of the premises. You also have the right to know the name and

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