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(A VISION FOR CHRISTIAN SONG, by Ken Bible; p.17)

But the performance and entertainment mentality has so pervaded our congregations that

congregations approach their hymns looking for emotional stimulation as the measure of value.

Additionally, as performance increasingly pervades congregational music, singability becomes

less and less important. The discipline of simplicity is often lost.

There’s more fall-out. With our church music addicted to high emotional energy and focused on

narrow, high-emotion topics, our songs get further and further away from day-by-day, moment-

by-moment Christian living. We talk less and less in daily, believable tones about daily, practical

issues. And let’s face it: happiness, holiness, and the salvation of needy people are won or lost

more on Monday morning than Sunday morning.

None of this is doom and gloom, nor is it intended as an indictment of any particular style of

music. The solution is not easy, but it is simple: remember and refocus. Christianity is less about

feeling better than about being better. For yourself and for your people, do you want to feel

better temporarily or be better every day through a closer relationship with Jesus Christ?

In our society, music is usually focused on temporary emotional stimulation. Music makers

gauge their success by how much they can stir their audience to excitement or sentiment,

though only for passing moments. Music can do much more than that. Expect more from your

church music. Expect more from your hymns. As you sing, look to the Living Christ. Desire to

know Him better and to live closer to Him. Let emotion be only an overflow of your faith in Him.

© 2002, 2008 by LNWhymns.com.

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