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July 2004)

School Type

Number of Schools

Years

Rolls

Full primary

7

1-8

1,854

Contributing

20

1-6

7,205

Special school

1

52

Intermediate

3

7-8

2,471

Composite

1

1-13

1,446

Teen-parent unit

1

22

Secondary

5

7 or 9-15

6,602

TOTAL

19,652

Source: Ministry of Education

The Ministry of Education attaches a decile rating to each school16, indicating the extent to which its students are drawn from low socio-economic communities. Schools with the highest proportion of students from low socio-economic communities are classed as decile 1, whereas schools with the lowest proportion of these students are decile 10 schools.

In July 2004, three Tauranga schools (the teen-parent unit and two contributing schools) were decile 1 schools, two were decile 2 and three were decile 3. Together, these eight schools had 10% of the district’s students. At the other end of the scale, 11 Tauranga schools were in deciles 8, 9 or 10. These schools were of all types and had one-third of the district’s students on their rolls.

Truancy

In August 2004, the Ministry of Education surveyed all state and state integrated schools to capture student attendance and absence over one week. The survey produced results for primary, composite and secondary schools in Tauranga, and showed that, overall, the district had a higher-than-average truancy rate.

Primary and composite schools were shown to have lower truancy rates than the national average. In Tauranga primary schools, the rate was 1.5%  (just below the 1.8% national rate). Composite schools had a truancy rate one third of the national average (1.1% compared with 3.3% nationwide). However, secondary schools in the district recorded a truancy rate considerably above the national average (10.2% compared with 6.9% across New Zealand). This gave Tauranga an overall average truancy rate of 4.4% compared with the national average of 3.4%.

16Six factors are used in determining a school’s socio-economic indicator. Five of these (household income, parents’ occupations, household crowding, parents’ educational qualifications, and parents receiving income support) are based on families with school-age children within the catchment area of the school. This information is combined with the sixth factor, school ethnicity data (the proportion of Maori and Pasifika students, and refugee students receiving ESOL support) to determine the school’s socio-economic indicator and thus the school’s decile.

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