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LAND TENURE

The forest land where most cooperatives operate is national forest (owned by the

central government and administered by COHDEFOR) or ejidal forest (communal land

which is administered by municipal governments). A small percentage of cooperatives or

individuals within cooperatives operate on private land. In order to tap resin or harvest

timber on national forest land, cooperatives must get permission from COHDEFOR and

pay tax or stumpage for the products extracted. In ejidal forests, the municipal

government grants permission and collects taxes, although COHDEFOR still must

approve the activities. For any forest management or harvesting activity to be approved

by COHDEFOR, cooperatives must have a management and annual operational plan for

their activities. Plans for resin tapping only are less complex than timber plans. For

individuals that work on private land, the resinero usually negotiates an agreement with

the landowner specifying how many trees he can tap and how much will be paid to the

landowner.

ORGANIZATIONS LINKED WITH THE SOCIAL FORESTRY

SYSTEM

The most important organization the cooperatives deal with regularly is

COHDEFOR. The original law which constituted COHDEFOR gave it power over all

forests in the country regardless of who owned the land. The agricultural modernization

law reduced COHDEFOR’s power, but all cooperatives that work on national and

municipal land must collaborate with COHDEFOR. Within the agency, there is a

separate social forestry division whose job is to monitor and support social forestry

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