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Faculty in the Cognitive

Psychology Program

Anne M. Cleary, Associate Professor Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University, 2001 Specialization: human recognition memory, metamemory familiarity-based recognition, tip-of-the-tongue states Web: http://lamar.colostate.edu/~acleary/AnneCleary.htm E-mail: Anne.Cleary@colostate.edu

Matthew G. Rhodes, Associate Professor Ph.D., Florida State University, 2004 Specialization: human memory, metacognition, cognitive aging Web: https://sites.google.com/site/rhodesmemorylab/ E-mail: Matthew.Rhodes@colostate.edu

Benjamin A. Clegg, Professor Ph.D., University of Oregon, 1998 Specialization: implicit learning, skill acquisition, applied cognitive psychology Web: http://lamar.colostate.edu/~bclegg/ E-mail: Benjamin.Clegg@colostate.edu

Carol A. Seger, Professor Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles Specialization: human learning and memory, categorization, cognitive neuroscience E-mail: Carol.Seger@colostate.edu

Edward L. DeLosh, Associate Professor Ph.D., Purdue University, 1996 Specialization: human learning and memory, cognitive aging, concept learning Web: http://lamar.colostate.edu/~delosh/ E-mail: Ed.DeLosh@colostate.edu

Jessica K. Witt, Associate Professor Ph.D., University of Virginia, 2007 Specialization: spatial perception, perception action relationships Web: http://lamar.colostate.edu/~jkwitt/ E-mail: Jessica.Witt@colostate.edu

Dr. Matthew G. Rhodes examines human memory and metacognition. One line of work investigates how subjective experience is related to memory performance, particularly for tasks such as predicting future memory performance. Other work examines subjective experience and its relation to memory accuracy, including how it pertains to aging populations. Dr. Rhodes also maintains lines of work examining memory for faces, predictors of individual differences in memory accuracy, and recognition memory processes.

memory processes in the medial temporal lobe and how they

interact with the methodologies in

basal her lab

ganglia.

The

primary

research

are functional magnetic resonance

imaging,

behavioral

testing,

and

computational

modeling.

Seger, C. A & Miller, E. K. (2010) Category learning in the brain. Annual Review of Neuroscience, 33, 203-219.

Seger, C. A, Peterson, E., Lopez-Paniagua, D., Cincotta, C.

M., &

Anderson, C. M (2010). Dissociating the

contributions of independent

corticostriatal systems to

Rhodes, M. G., & Anastasi, J. S. (2012). The own-age bias in face recognition: A meta-analytic and theoretical review. Psychological Bulletin, 138, 146-174.

visual categorization learning through the reinforcement learning modeling and Granger modeling. NeuroImage, 50, 644-656.

use of causality

Rhodes, M. G., & Tauber, S. K. (2011). The influence of delaying Judgments of Learning (JOLs) on metacognitive accuracy: A meta-analytic review. Psychological Bulletin,

137, 131-148.

Seger, C. A., Dennison, C. S., Lopez-Paniagua, D Peterson, E. J., & Roark A. (2011). Dissociating hippocampal and

basal ganglia contributions to stimulus novelty and subjective 55, 1739-1753.

category learning using judgments. NeuroImage,

Rhodes, M. G., Castel, A. D

., & Jacoby, L. L. (2008).

Associative recognition of face pairs by younger and older adults: The role of familiarity-based processing. Psychology and Aging, 23, 239-249.

Dr. Carol executive

Seger studies the neural systems underlying functions, decision making, memory, and

learning, particularly

categorization and sequence learning.

Much of the current cognitive processes

research in her lab examines how rely on interactions between the

these basal

Dr. Jessica K. Witt examines the effects of action on perception. For example, softball players who are hitting better than others see the ball as bigger. Objects that are easier to block look to be moving slower than objects that are more difficult to block. People who are obese see distances as farther. Her findings demonstrate that perception is not just a function of optical information but is also influenced by the perceiver's body, abilities, and intentions.

ganglia

and

cerebral

cortex.

Her

lab

also

studies

declarative

Cognitive Psychology at CSU Page 6

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