X hits on this document

PDF document

November 26, 1999 / Vol. 48 / No. 46 - page 19 / 20

58 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

19 / 20

Vol. 48 / No. 46 Poliomyelitis Eradication — Continued

MMWR

1071

the region without any recognized governments. The intensified campaigns, addi- tional NIDs, and rapid development of surveillance require substantial additional hu- man and financial resources that must be provided jointly by the concerned governments and partner agencies and by the global coalition of partners and local NGOs in areas without a government.

References

  • 1.

    CDC. Progress toward poliomyelitis eradication during armed conflict—Somalia and southern Sudan, January 1998–June 1999. MMWR 1999;48:633–7.

  • 2.

    CDC. Wild poliovirus transmission in bordering areas of Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Turkey, 1997–June

    • 1998.

      MMWR 1998;47:588–92.

  • 3.

    CDC. Update: mass vaccination with oral poliovirus vaccine—Asia and Europe, 1996. MMWR

1996;45:911–4. 4. CDC. Update: progress toward poliomyelitis eradication—South East Asia Region, 1995–1997.

MMWR 1997;46:468–73. 5. CDC. Virologic surveillance and progress toward poliomyelitis eradication—Eastern Mediter-

ranean Region, 1995–September 1998. MMWR 1998;47:1001–5.

6. CDC.

Progress

toward

poliomyelitis

eradication—Afghanistan,

1994–1999.

MMWR

1999;48:825–8.

Poliomyelitis Eradication — Continued

Contributors to the Production of the MMWR (Weekly) Weekly Notifiable Disease Morbidity Data and 122 Cities Mortality Data

Samuel L. Groseclose, D.V.M., M.P.H.

State Support Team Robert Fagan Jose Aponte Paul Gangarosa, M.P.H. Gerald Jones David Nitschke Carol A. Worsham

CDC Operations Team Carol M. Knowles Deborah A. Adams Willie J. Anderson Fredrick Browder Patsy A. Hall Kathryn Snavely

Document info
Document views58
Page views58
Page last viewedSun Dec 11 04:31:49 UTC 2016
Pages20
Paragraphs5429
Words11358

Comments