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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION OF NORTH CAROLINA, FOR THE YEAR 1869. - page 3 / 21

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children between the ages of six and twenty-one years, actually resident in the County also the number and condition of school houses.

        This duty has been performed in all the Counties with two exceptions, viz: Edgecombe and Onslow. The whole number of school children in the State as reported, is three hundred and thirty thousand five hundred and eighty-one, (330,581.) Of this number, 223,815 are white, and 106,766 are colored.

        Whole number of school houses reported are 1,906; of them, 178 are characterised as good, and 685 as bad.

        The census report of County Commissioners is hereunto appended.

        The law requires the Public School money to be apportioned by the Superintendent of Public Instruction, to each County, in proportion to the number of persons in the County between the ages of six and twenty-one years, and the distribution to be made according to the census of 1868.

        The General Assembly having appropriated one hundred thousand dollars from the General Treasury for school purposes,

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and having reason to believe that an equal sum will be derived from the Capitation tax, the Superintendent has apportioned among the several Counties, excepting Edgecombe and Onslow, the sum of $165,290.50, this allows fifty cents per census child or person, (see Table.)

        If, when the taxes are finally collected, a further distribution can be made, additional schools will be provided for, or the terms of those already existing can be prolonged, in either case as the public good shall require.

        School authorities are receiving all necessary instructions and information.

        They can proceed forthwith to establish as many schools as their funds will permit. It is suggested, however, that the funds for this year be expended on a few good, rather than on many poor or indifferent schools. It is far better, and more economical, to employ a few able, well qualified teachers at good, living wages, than many poor teachers at small wages. It is infinitely wiser, more for the public good, that a few children should be correctly, successfully instructed than that many should be erroneously and viciously taught. It is better for the system of public instruction now organizing, that there should be a few good, rather than many poor schools. To give it a successful course the system must have a good beginning.

        It is to be regretted that the pecuniary condition of the State, did not allow a larger appropriation for the last year. But we hope, and quietly expect, that better times will be met with more liberal devisings.

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