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To remain competitive and stimulate customer demand, the Company must successfully manage frequent product introductions and transitions.

Due to the highly volatile and competitive nature of the industries in which the Company competes, the Company must continually introduce new products, services and technologies, enhance existing products and services, and effectively stimulate customer demand for new and upgraded products. The success of new product introductions depends on a number of factors including but not limited to timely and successful product development, market acceptance, the Company’s ability to manage the risks associated with new products and production ramp issues, the availability of application software for new products, the effective management of purchase commitments and inventory levels in line with anticipated product demand, the availability of products in appropriate quantities and costs to meet anticipated demand, and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects in the early stages of introduction. Accordingly, the Company cannot determine in advance the ultimate effect of new product introductions and transitions on its financial condition and operating results.

The Company faces substantial inventory and other asset risk in addition to purchase commitment cancellation risk.

The Company records a write-down for product and component inventories that have become obsolete or exceed anticipated demand or net realizable value and accrues necessary cancellation fee reserves for orders of excess products and components. The Company also reviews its long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changed circumstances indicate the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. If the Company determines that impairment has occurred, it records a write-down equal to the amount by which the carrying value of the assets exceeds its fair market value. Although the Company believes its provisions related to inventory, other assets and purchase commitments are currently adequate, no assurance can be given that the Company will not incur additional related charges given the rapid and unpredictable pace of product obsolescence in the industries in which the Company competes. Such charges could materially adversely affect the Company’s financial condition and operating results.

The Company must order components for its products and build inventory in advance of product announcements and shipments. Consistent with industry practice, components are normally acquired through a combination of purchase orders, supplier contracts, open orders and, where appropriate, inventory component prepayments, in each case based on projected demand. Such purchase commitments typically cover forecasted component and manufacturing requirements for 30 to 150 days. Because the Company’s markets are volatile, competitive and subject to rapid technology and price changes, there is a risk the Company will forecast incorrectly and order or produce excess or insufficient amounts of components or products, or not fully utilize firm purchase commitments. The Company’s financial condition and operating results have been in the past and could be in the future materially adversely affected by the Company’s ability to manage its inventory levels and respond to short-term shifts in customer demand patterns.

Future operating results depend upon the Company’s ability to obtain key components including but not limited to microprocessors, NAND flash memory, DRAM and LCDs at favorable prices and in sufficient quantities.

Because the Company currently obtains certain key components including but not limited to microprocessors, enclosures, certain LCDs, certain optical drives, and ASICs, from single or limited sources, the Company is subject to significant supply and pricing risks. Many of these and other key components that are available from multiple sources including but not limited to NAND flash memory, DRAM and certain LCDs, are subject at times to industry-wide shortages and significant commodity pricing fluctuations. The Company has entered into certain agreements for the supply of key components including but not limited to microprocessors, NAND flash memory, DRAM and LCDs with favorable pricing, but there can be no guarantee that the Company will be able to extend or renew these agreements on similar favorable terms, or at all, upon expiration or otherwise obtain favorable pricing in the future. The follow-on effects from the credit crisis on the Company’s key suppliers, referred to in “Economic conditions could materially adversely affect the Company” above, which is incorporated herein by reference, also could affect the Company’s ability to obtain key components. Therefore, the Company remains subject to significant risks of supply shortages and/or price increases that could materially adversely affect the Company’s financial condition and operating results. The Company expects to experience decreases in its gross margin percentage in future periods, as compared to levels achieved during the first half of 2011, largely due to a higher mix of new and innovative products that have higher cost structures and deliver greater value to customers, and expected and potential future component cost and other cost increases. For additional information refer to Part I, Item 2, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” under the subheading “Gross Margin,” which is incorporated herein by reference.

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