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September 25, 2010

Adjusted Cost

Unrealized Gains

Unrealized Losses

Fair

Value

Cash and Cash

Equivalents

Short-Term Marketable Securities

Long-Term Marketable Securities

Cash

$ 1,690

$

0

$

0

$ 1,690

$

1,690

$

0

$

0

9,872

42

0

9,914

2,571

2,130

5,213

8,717

10

0

8,727

1,916

4,339

2,472

2,648

13

0

2,661

10

865

1,786

2,735

5

(1)

2,739

374

850

1,515

3,168

0

0

3,168

1,889

1,279

0

17,349

102

(9)

17,442

58

4,522

12,862

1,899

19

(1)

1,917

0

374

1,543

46,388

191

(11)

46,568

6,818

14,359

25,391

2,753

0

0

2,753

2,753

0

0

$50,831

$

191

$

(11)

$51,011

$ 11,261

$ 14,359

$ 25,391

Level 1: Money market funds

Level 2:

  • U.

    S. Treasury securities

  • U.

    S. agency securities

Non-U.S. government securities Certificates of deposit and time deposits Commercial paper Corporate securities Municipal securities

Subtotal Total

The net unrealized gains as of March 26, 2011 and September 25, 2010 related primarily to long-term marketable securities. The Company may sell certain of its marketable securities prior to their stated maturities for strategic reasons including, but not limited to, anticipation of credit deterioration and duration management. The Company recognized net realized gains of $41 million and $56 million during the three- and six-month periods ended March 26, 2011, respectively. The Company recognized no significant net realized gains or losses during the three- and six-month periods ended March 27, 2010. The maturities of the Company’s long-term marketable securities generally range from one year to five years.

As of March 26, 2011 and September 25, 2010, gross unrealized losses related to individual securities that had been in a continuous loss position for 12 months or longer were not significant.

The Company considers the declines in market value of its marketable securities investment portfolio to be temporary in nature. The Company typically invests in highly-rated securities, and its policy generally limits the amount of credit exposure to any one issuer. The Company’s investment policy requires investments to generally be investment grade, primarily rated single-A or better, with the objective of minimizing the potential risk of principal loss. Fair values were determined for each individual security in the investment portfolio. When evaluating the investments for other-than-temporary impairment, the Company reviews factors such as the length of time and extent to which fair value has been below cost basis, the financial condition of the issuer and any changes thereto, and the Company’s intent to sell, or whether it is more likely than not it will be required to sell, the investment before recovery of the investment’s amortized cost basis. During the three- and six-month periods ended March 26, 2011 and March 27, 2010, the Company did not recognize any significant impairment charges. As of March 26, 2011, the Company does not consider any of its investments to be other-than-temporarily impaired.

Derivative Financial Instruments

The Company uses derivatives to partially offset its business exposure to foreign currency exchange risk. The Company may enter into foreign currency forward and option contracts to offset some of the foreign exchange risk on expected future cash flows on certain forecasted revenue and cost of sales, on net investments in certain foreign subsidiaries, and on certain existing assets and liabilities. To help protect gross margins from fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates, certain of the Company’s subsidiaries whose functional currency is the U.S. dollar hedge a portion of forecasted foreign currency revenue. The Company’s subsidiaries whose functional currency is not the U.S. dollar and who sell in local currencies may hedge a portion of forecasted inventory purchases not denominated in the subsidiaries’ functional currencies. The Company typically hedges portions of its forecasted foreign currency exposure associated with revenue and inventory purchases for three to six months. To help protect the net investment in a foreign operation from adverse changes in foreign currency exchange rates, the Company may enter into foreign currency forward and option contracts to offset the changes in the carrying amounts of these investments due to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. The Company may also enter into foreign currency forward and option contracts to partially offset the foreign currency exchange gains and losses generated by the re-measurement of certain assets and liabilities denominated in non-functional currencies. However, the Company may choose not to hedge certain foreign currency exchange exposures for a variety of reasons including, but not limited to, materiality, accounting considerations and the prohibitive economic cost of hedging particular exposures. There can be no assurance the hedges will offset more than a portion of the financial impact resulting from movements in foreign currency exchange rates.

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